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#1 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 04:56 PM

I thought it would be useful to hear the diffrent rates at which people work, how many minutes of script they can cover in a day:

For Commericals, Television Drama, Studio based Sitcoms, Independant Feature films and Studio features.
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#2 Paul Wizikowski

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 10:38 AM

You can get through more than one?!? Thats crazy talk!!!

No, it seems like its never the same. Each project gets into its own groove and pace.
There was a puppet tv show I worked on that would shoot 3 episodes in 2 weeks (12/6) and we covered on average three a day i think.

The shorts I've worked on vary wildly. From as many as 8 to as slow as just a couple.

As for music videos, most I've done are just one day. Only once did we venture into a second day (the first in studio for greenscreen and the second on location).

That said one of the most ambitious projects for is coming up....22 pages in two nights. Fortunatly (and slightly because the budget forces only this) the story lends itself to long single shot scenes. Very M. Night-esk.
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#3 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 02:46 PM

You can get through more than one?!? Thats crazy talk!!!

No, it seems like its never the same. Each project gets into its own groove and pace.
There was a puppet tv show I worked on that would shoot 3 episodes in 2 weeks (12/6) and we covered on average three a day i think.

The shorts I've worked on vary wildly. From as many as 8 to as slow as just a couple.

As for music videos, most I've done are just one day. Only once did we venture into a second day (the first in studio for greenscreen and the second on location).

That said one of the most ambitious projects for is coming up....22 pages in two nights. Fortunatly (and slightly because the budget forces only this) the story lends itself to long single shot scenes. Very M. Night-esk.


Interesting, curious to know how quickly some american independant films have been shot at.
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 04:58 PM

5-6 pages a day is common for many TV shows and features, but in can vary wildly depending on a lot of variables. It gets hard to keep up a really high page count for too many days in a row; people get tired and start making mistakes.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 05:54 PM

The fastest feature shoot for me was 15 days for "Jackpot" but Howard Wexler shot a 35mm anamorphic mummy movie in 4 days!
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#6 Daniel Stigler

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:20 PM

I'm used to do 5-7 minutes a day for television series which is pretty tough. On musicvideos and commercials it varies widely. All musicvideos i worked on were shot in either one or two (long) days. The fastest commercial i did was half a day, the slowest 5 days with one shooting day where we did 1,5 seconds of screening time.
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#7 nathan hope

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:58 PM

Network television 1 hour series in the US usually shoot 5-7 pages a day. It goes higher and lower, depending on how "talky" or action based the show is.

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#8 Chris Keth

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 07:09 PM

On the last student short I shot, I had a gaffer I really meshed well with and we did 5 or 6 pages and only had 8-ish hour days (that's what you get shooting around paying work and classes) It helped that the director was very decisive. He wasn't very hem-haw-y at all. :D

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 28 July 2006 - 07:10 PM.

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