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Ektachrome 100D vs 64D and 50D


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#1 Chris_Burket

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 07:14 PM

So I'm thinking about shooting a short spec commercial out on a dry lake bed. I'm going for the very contrasty, saturated look often found in commercials and I thought Ektachrome 100D might be the way to go. What do you think? Is it worth paying the extra for E-6 processing or could this look be just as easily achieved with 64D or 50D and some tweaking on the DaVinci?

I know 100D is supposed to render more contrast and more saturation, but considering the ammount of post-processing that can now be done with film, is there a point to paying the extra for the film and the processing?
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#2 A.Oliver

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 07:33 AM

Hi, further to your question, could someone at the same time please advise which stock has the greater resolving power. Footage i have so far exposed with 100d appears softer than kodachrome. When my k/c stock runs out i wish to shoot either 100d or 7201, which ever stock is sharper.
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#3 Bryan Darling

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 12:55 PM

I've found 7285 to have a lot more latitude than envy other reversal film I've shot. The last shoot I did we underexposed it by one-stop, on purpose, and there was still a lot of detail. We decided to go even further to one and one-half stops under just to get it moody enough. I really liked the colors and contrast.

In my opinion, shooting reversal is more a personal aesthetic and process choice. Could you get similar results shooting a negative film and then manipulating it in post? Sure, I don't see why not. However, why would you want to go to all the trouble and various processes when you can get the very look you want in one step...by shooting it that way.

I find it so much easier to shoot film the way I want it to look rather than do it all later in a computer or telecine suite. It gives me a greater understanding of the medium- film, not to mention a lot less work. I feel too much of today's filmmaking, especially by those new to film, seem less about learning craft and employing it in the creation and more about the "end result." Film is more than just a movie, a commercial, and a music video. Film is a process and by learning the process and it's eccentricities, nuances, and faults you find a medium that is literally without limits. Film is more than just a movie, a commercial, and a music video.

Now, that I'm far off topic, haha, let me just say that I love reversal films. You can't argue about the color or the exposure because it is what it is on the film. Same as slide film in still work, you look at the film and you know what you got and how to print it or scan it, or in the case of motion-picture work, how to telecine it. If you do choose to tweak it, you still can. I've found that tweaking in general is much more straight forward when you shoot film (any type) the way you want it to look in the finished piece.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 02:49 PM

The E100D is a good choice for the "look" you want:

http://www.kodak.com...s...4.6.4&lc=en

Intense saturation + true 100 speed


Now you have a 100-speed color reversal motion picture film designed for daylight. Whether you're shooting ads, music videos, documentaries, television, or features, it delivers intensely saturated color, plus a neutral gray scale and accurate skin tones. All with a sharpness you won't find in any other 100-speed reversal film


http://www.kodak.com...l/5285faq.jhtml Q&A
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Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

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