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#1 John Adolfi

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 06:01 AM

What type of tripod do you use? Ever use a monopod? When? How critical are our results of buying a great expensive vs. moderate priced tripod? Fluid head?
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#2 Steve Wallace

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 01:33 PM

What type of tripod do you use? Ever use a monopod? When? How critical are our results of buying a great expensive vs. moderate priced tripod? Fluid head?

I use a Sachtler tripod, they are worth every penny if you want good results. However, for super 8 it may be a bit of an over kill. Also, a bit on the lower end I have used the Manfrotto line of tripods and monopods. Which should be plenty good for super 8. Fluid head deffinately helps, to make your pans smoother and dare I say more, "professional".

I would stay away from cheap equipment, I used it in the past (years ago) and had people ask if the footage was hand held there was so much camera shake.
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#3 Chris Gravat

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 05:26 PM

What type of tripod do you use? Ever use a monopod? When? How critical are our results of buying a great expensive vs. moderate priced tripod? Fluid head?


The Manfrotto 501 and 503 Heads are great. I think you can get the 503 with sticks for around $500.00 from B&H.

- Chris Gravat
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#4 Robert Hughes

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 05:40 PM

A Monopod can come in handy for run-and-gun S8 shooting; this year most of my S8 has been shot with a monopod attached. You get more stability than handheld, and when moving you can treat it like a poor man's Steadicam, depending on your agility and ability to balance the camera versus the extended stick. Don't expect tripod-like steadiness; even planted on the ground, a monopod only provides stability in the vertical direction, and you still get horizontal shake (particularly at long zooms).

If you ever have the money or connections, you owe it to yourself to try a good fluid tripod like a Sachtler. Your footage improves 100% immediately.
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#5 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 04:16 AM

The ability to instantly level out your tripod via a ball head is the one that tends to get overlooked. As a result the filmmaker has to perfectly level off three tripod legs versus simply having them close to level and then making a final adjustment via the ball head.
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#6 Darren Blin

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 05:41 AM

Miller makes some great lightweight fluid head tripods with a ball head. These ones are designed with DV cameras in mind but work great with Super 8. I use one with a DV camera all the time:

http://www.millertri...?...a&sysType=1
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#7 David W Scott

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 11:09 AM

I currently own and use a Manfrotto 028 (legs) and 516 (head). I use it for ENG cameras (DVCPRO, BCSP) and smaller (DVX100).

It is the equal to any Sachtler or Miller that I have used over the years. For the same stability, the Manfrotto might be a little heavier -- but I don't think that's a bad thing in tripods. It has the features you need, adjustability, height, bubbles, full size quick-release plate, two handles (good for studio work).

Stay away from anything too light. Even big-dollar carbon fibre tripods have too much "give" in them for my liking.
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#8 Timothy David Orme

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 12:10 PM

If you're sticking with super 8, there's no reason to get anything really heavy duty, unless you plan on blimping your camera. I use a Manfroto 503/525 combo. It's good for shooting with the lighter super8 and digital cameras. The fluid head's nice because it allows for very smooth pans and tilts, assuming you have an operator that takes the time to work it properly.

If you were going to shoot any type of heavier camera I'd suggest a completely different type of setup. A fluid head would still be fine (although much more spendy), but you'd have to get some heavy duty sticks, like the Ronford Baker set, or even a nice old school set of wooden sticks (which I love).
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#9 Adam White

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 12:44 PM

I would stay away from cheap equipment, I used it in the past (years ago) and had people ask if the footage was hand held there was so much camera shake.


Gifts from family, trying to be helpfull. the curse of the plastic tripod.

I am interested in how many of you use monopods in filming. I often think either 3legs or none. do a lot of people utilise them extensively?
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#10 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 02:28 PM

Gifts from family, trying to be helpfull. the curse of the plastic tripod.

I am interested in how many of you use monopods in filming. I often think either 3legs or none. do a lot of people utilise them extensively?


Monopods makes sense if you will be in a crowded area wheree tripods aren't allowed at all.
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#11 Steve Wallace

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 03:07 PM

If you're sticking with super 8, there's no reason to get anything really heavy duty, unless you plan on blimping your camera. I use a Manfroto 503/525 combo. It's good for shooting with the lighter super8 and digital cameras. The fluid head's nice because it allows for very smooth pans and tilts, assuming you have an operator that takes the time to work it properly.

If you were going to shoot any type of heavier camera I'd suggest a completely different type of setup. A fluid head would still be fine (although much more spendy), but you'd have to get some heavy duty sticks, like the Ronford Baker set, or even a nice old school set of wooden sticks (which I love).


On my last super 8 short, it was probably 60/20/20 (Sachtler tripod/Manfrotto monopod/handheld)
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