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#1 G McMahon

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 11:20 AM

Sometimes you can achieve an edge light or liner with no back light. I have noticed this when the BG is bright (even though there is separation from the BG). How can you control this? Is the skin picking up this edge as it is reflecting the brightness back to camera (like a mirror or sheen)? Will more separation from the BG overcome this, I shouldn?t think so. How can you achieve a perfect silhouette when the BG is bright? Is there some science I am missing here?

And going the other way, could you employ this technique from lights in shot in BG that would register unexposed at the incident of the subject yet yield a rim/ liner light?

I like to comprehend the science of it fully to utilize the benefits.

Thanks all,

Graeme (My apologies, I don?t thank anyone at the end of my threads as I do not wish people to waste their time thinking a new reply has been added. I do appreciate participant?s candour, knowledge and advice).
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:03 PM

You move the silhouetted object as far from the background as possible to reduce bounce-back, you expose for the background, you use off-camera large black flags to remove any background light from reaching the person, you add more contrast in post, you make sure the the subject is not shiny.
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#3 G McMahon

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 01:27 AM

I may not have worded it correctly. I will reference a scene from Kill Bill. During a sword fight scene in a restaurant the lights go out and all the characters are silhouetted by a huge (studio) window. They are very close to the source yet; do not seem to register any liners. I imagine that the BG source is cross lit and slightly underexposed.

I experiment, I hold my fist up towards a window, I am deep in a room. My fist does not register a liner. I move the fist away to the right of the window so directly behind my fist is the wall. I can now see a liner. Holding now my head and fist in the same position (same angle, head, fist relative to window), I slide my body across so my fist comes back across the window. The liner disappears just as the fist comes across the window. Why is it so?

In understanding this I imagine I could utilize it. A back light may not be necessary if the angle of back ground practicals in shot though not throwing sufficient light to give much exposure (which would make them sit well, not blown out), will in fact give separation through the use of its liner.

My apologies Mr. Mullen if I over analyse certain elements, but understanding gives me peace of mind.

Thanks,

Graeme
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#4 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 01:50 PM

i think you worded it correctly and i think david answered it correctly too. as for your experiment, when you move your fist to the right you're seeing more of the side of it that's being lit by the window, while if it's in front of you you only see the side that's not lit. no magic.

/matt
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Aerial Filmworks

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