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Music Video: Apocalyptica


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#1 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 05:53 PM

This is my third project (music film) produced at the New York Film Academy (NYFA). Shot in three hours and one location using Kodak Plus X (ISO 60) 16mm film on a Arri camera.

Please tell me what u think about it. I am more curious to know what u think I did wrong or could have done better/different.

Thanx and enjoy

Apocalyptica - Cohka (youtube.com)
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#2 seth christian

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 11:31 AM

great music! love the band.
the video was just ok though.
I personally feel you've made a prime
mistake of shooting hardly any footage.
It keeps no interest in the viewer.
the story is weak because there's so little
imagery to tell one.
its just the same footage over and over
and over and over and over.
I'm like waiting for a transition,...waiting...
more kitchen.....more hallway....more kitchen
....a little reverse footage of the hallway again...
then....the flower scene, so yes..there is some
kind of closure, but there's NO BODY!?!?
had some great spotlight shots, pretty good
exposure and acting and decent compositions.

anywho, just telling you how I felt about it.
no intentions of being cruel or mean, but
sometimes those replies are the best ones
to make us better. good luck with your
next project.
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#3 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 12:41 AM

thanx mate. I appreciate honest feedback.

I only had three rolls of film to make a music video (therefore also the abrupt cut at the end). My idea was to tell a story between two people from the girls perspective. The repeated shots therefore can act as a change in time and progress in their relationship. We keep switching between her and the other juxtaposed images of the them out of which I tried to create an effect that maybe she is remembering something.(if that makes any sense :blink: )

Maybe if I put them in a different order it makes more sense...and more exciting to watch.

I also on purpose left out the body, because I believe to make the audience imagine the accident would more powerful then to show the actual body. In that case I thought the dropping flowers could represent the same thing <_<

Anyway, this is only my third film I have made on film and I am more then happy with the results.

Edited by fl1x, 01 August 2006 - 12:45 AM.

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#4 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 12:55 AM

wow...that was poor english...
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#5 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 04:21 AM

Very repetitive. Did not hold my interest for the entire length of the film. Consider a less choppy, shorter version.
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#6 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 12:03 PM

it was the idea to be repetitive. i guess i ve to rearrange the story a little to become more exciting.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts

Edited by fl1x, 06 August 2006 - 12:04 PM.

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#7 Nitay Artenstein

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Posted 07 August 2006 - 04:07 AM

I wish to differ with most people who replied here. There was not enough footage, that's true, but the editing managed to give a very good sense of rhythm to the whole piece. It made you feel you can understand the story without having it told to you in a linear, classic way. The editing also made perfect sense with the way the woman felt: Like when you lose someone you love, and flashbacks keep coming back to you as if in random. You could really feel her agony in that editing.

It kind of reminded me of Dziga Vertov's 'Man with a Movie Camera', though I'm not sure why. Well done.
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#8 Paul Wizikowski

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 12:02 PM

First reaction: Thats it? Half way through I was conciouslly thinking "alright, lets see something else." The flower scene was too little too late.

I understand budget constraints and limitations (only having 3 rolls of film) but that cant be used as an excuse to justify the merit of a piece. In the end its not exciting. Its not entertaining. Working with what you've got means attempting something that you can pull off. I don't think you had what you needed to tell this story. In truth i didn't mind the limited number of setups {1)Girl in hallway, 2)Girl on couch, 3)Man on couch, 4)Couple in kitchen} that were used for the bulk of the film. Just having them do more things in those setups would have helped. Its the continually seeing her sulk in the chair again and again that loses the viewer. Have her get up in one shot. Have her fiddle with something. Just have more action.

Now for the good stuff: I appreciate the style. It reminded me of Pi by Darren Aronofsky that mixed with early 20's film camera feel. I liked the speed up and slow down. I liked seeing the progression from happy to argueing in the kitchen. It felt like you were feeling the repetition of their life and how that just weighs on good people and builds frustration.

You got something there it just needs more footage, more action, more thought.
Keep it up.
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#9 David Sweetman

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 05:07 PM

On a limit of stock like that, what I would have done is told part of the story in still images. I think you should have saved all the "moving-light" shots until the intense strings came in, then used up all of them.

Also, there's better ways to hit a guy with a car! It's kinda unconvincing how you've shot it here.

Overall though, good job; despite the overused footage, it keept my attention, especially with the reveal of the fight towards the end.
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#10 Kirk Productions

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 03:02 PM

People can be quite brutal here, can't they. It is good to ask though because you get invaluable information, even if it is hard to swallow.

First, given the film limits, etc, I would have done a series of rehearsals to save as much as possible before going hot. Maybe you did that, not sure but you needed more scenes. It was an obvious relationship going in the crapper and given the sequences, you could have done that in half the time. Now, restricted by a song length, another story.

You could definitely tell the story in just a few of those kitchen clips and it became quite repetitive. I kept expecting a knock down drag out fight, a slap, or something. The girl was also unconvincing in her part... That part is understandable if you use volunteers and such.

You showed your talent in the first few clips but when it got into the repetitive thing, it took away from your talent. Interesting lighting, effects and so forth.

Now, that car, I agree with the one gentleman, very unconvincing. Really, all you had going for it is the flowers flying. I would have had the car speed by faster in one take, cutting back to him spotting it in another but not together. I would have also shown some sort of low speed impact, cut to him coming to a halt on the road (as if landing with some abrasions), ending with the flowers being launched further away.

Eric



This is my third project (music film) produced at the New York Film Academy (NYFA). Shot in three hours and one location using Kodak Plus X (ISO 60) 16mm film on a Arri camera.

Please tell me what u think about it. I am more curious to know what u think I did wrong or could have done better/different.

Thanx and enjoy

Apocalyptica - Cohka (youtube.com)


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#11 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 04:17 PM

Yeah, criticism can be harsh, but it's very important to get some. You don't really see your film the same way as others do.

Once again, I know it is really really repetitive, but I did not want to cut down the song. It builds up so nicely with the story and I did not have enough footage to fill the gaps. Argh!! I know. My mistake. I learnt.

I tried to re-edit it, but it won't really work with this music that nicely anymore. So I have to find a different song first and then cut it down to it.

About the car scene. True, it does not look as convincing as it should and I did not realize it until I really saw it myself. Granted that. I though think that even if it does not look great I told the story through the visual and it works. The flying flowers certanly makes a more interesting picture and tells the story, whether the car was to slow or not. You all got it!

I am more then pleased with the results and I have also learnt a lot from it, but at least now I have the time to make some. Where else do u learn if not from the mistakes you make?

Thanks again for all of the feedback
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#12 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 05:12 PM

Ok...I also uploaded two other short ones I did around the same time.

"The Kidnapping" (silent), was my second film I made (before this Music Video).

"City Lights" I made shortly after (more as a test shoot for a 500T color film roll :D).

Well, I wouldn't really praise them, but I am now sharing them. Don't expect too much, but let me know anyway what you think of them if you feel like it.

The Kidnapping
City Lights

Enjoy!
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