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#1 Noah Ward

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 11:02 AM

I am currently looking for a good audio mixer and cant decide between a two-channel and a 3-channel. The mixers that I am looking at are both Sound Devices and the 3 channel is nearly twice the price of the two. Here is my situation; I will be taking audio in an insert stage doing mainly talking head and 2 person interviewer/interviewee stuff. There might be the possibility of multiple interviewees at some point and for these situations, if I had a two-channel mixer, I would run multiple mics two a single channel. However, I am curious as to how this would affect the quality of the audio. Anybody care to weigh in? Is the extra channel worth the price?
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#2 Rob Whitehurst

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 09:48 PM

I am currently looking for a good audio mixer and cant decide between a two-channel and a 3-channel. The mixers that I am looking at are both Sound Devices and the 3 channel is nearly twice the price of the two. Here is my situation; I will be taking audio in an insert stage doing mainly talking head and 2 person interviewer/interviewee stuff. There might be the possibility of multiple interviewees at some point and for these situations, if I had a two-channel mixer, I would run multiple mics two a single channel. However, I am curious as to how this would affect the quality of the audio. Anybody care to weigh in? Is the extra channel worth the price?



I understand your cost issue but for what you may have to do, get the three channel. Never "Y" two mics together in that kind of situation. There are times when that may work but not for interviews. You have no control over individual volume if two mics are Y'd together. And it can cause all kind of other problems too.

Just not a good idea. Go with the three. A two input mixer is highly specialized and limited.

Good luck!
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#3 Noah Ward

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Posted 22 August 2006 - 11:46 AM

I understand your cost issue but for what you may have to do, get the three channel. Never "Y" two mics together in that kind of situation. There are times when that may work but not for interviews. You have no control over individual volume if two mics are Y'd together. And it can cause all kind of other problems too.

Just not a good idea. Go with the three. A two input mixer is highly specialized and limited.

Good luck!



Thanks Rob! I ended up getting a Sound Devices 302 3 channel and im pretty happy with it.
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#4 Rob Whitehurst

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:31 PM

Thanks Rob! I ended up getting a Sound Devices 302 3 channel and im pretty happy with it.


Glad you are happy with it Noah. Sorry for the late reply!
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Wooden Camera

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Rig Wheels Passport

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks