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#1 David Sweetman

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 03:47 AM

There's the possibility that in about a year I'll be directing a live multi-camera event. The image would probably be projected on a screen in an auditorium so the 2000 or so people could see the speaker; we would also sell DVDs afterwards. I'm thinking I could cover it with 3 cameras on the floor, perhaps one of those on a balcony. There would be sessions to cover twice a day for 5 or 6 days. My question is, what camera would you choose for this application? I was thinking some sort of digibeta, but if I could stay digital, perhaps a JVC GY-DV5000, that would make post easier. I've never used one of those cameras though and I don't know if it would work for a live show. I haven't done anything live since high school (where we used BetaSP) so any advice on monitors/switcher would be helpful; like places to rent, places to explain to me the set-up, etc. I want to research all that stuff now so that when the time comes, I'll know exactly what I want to do and how I want to do it.
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#2 Jeff Regan

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 10:24 AM

David,

A live, switched event is not tape format driven. The most suitable cameras are those with CCU's and studio
configurations, not camcorders. You will need to rent a fly pack with appropriate switcher(composite or component analog or SDI), monitoring and terminal equipment. Once that is in place, you can choose whatever
tape format is suitable from a quality, post workflow and budget standpoint.

If you will be mixing computer source, such as Power Point, or just want to make the most out of the projected
image, I would recommend using a seamless switcher/scaler downstream of the fly pack SD switcher. A scaler allows the SD camera signals to be upconverted to computer and/or projection native scan rate for better quality, which is especially important for computer sources. Typically the house projection feed is a different cut than that which is sent to tape. For projection, you would tend to use less wide shots vs. what goes to DVD.

Jeff Regan
Shooting Star Video
www.ssv.com
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#3 David Sweetman

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 04:30 PM

Thanks, that helped a TON. We'd probably want to rent down here in LA/Burbank. Anyway I'll research all this...at least I've got the terms now to do so. There will be powerpoint to mix, so I'll look into a scaler too, thanks
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 11:26 PM

Thanks, that helped a TON. We'd probably want to rent down here in LA/Burbank. Anyway I'll research all this...at least I've got the terms now to do so. There will be powerpoint to mix, so I'll look into a scaler too, thanks



Make sure not to let production skimp on headsets for everyone. I directed a live camera thing where they neglected that. I gave them a tape of a static wide shot of the whole play. <_<
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#5 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 01:14 AM

Make sure not to let production skimp on headsets for everyone. I directed a live camera thing where they neglected that. I gave them a tape of a static wide shot of the whole play. <_<


I don't really understand. Did you eventually give them a switched version?

This is really a very complicated situation.

There are so many issues to consider. One being do you do iso's on all the cameras or not. Generally the answer is, yes, you do iso's on ALL the cameras. And suddenly, just like that, your budget has doubled.

This then becomes the reason why betacam sp is STILL popular for exactly the kind of shoot you are doing.
Digital betacam hour by hour can become cost prohibitive whereas Betacam Sp is generally less expensive at each and every step.

DV-Cam is a decent option but if you "er" in the decks you get suddenly you'll find that your time-codes don't jam etc, etc. I edited a multi-camera project a couple of years ago and after they got distribution they requested I be present on the the one that was recently shot.

It could take hours to effectively point out all the things that can go wrong, and keep in mind, this is a relatively simple show that your are putting together, imagine how tought it is when there is a ton of talent and live musical numbers and having limo's to pick up talent and cater to them etc...
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 01:29 AM

I don't really understand. Did you eventually give them a switched version?



I didn't, actually. I gave them the better version. The cameramen had never seen a researsal of the play before they were to shoot it, but I had. I was expected to direct the cameramen to opportune places at the opportune times to catch those great special shots but I couldn't without headsets. Since they had to wing it, the camera men were generally in the right place just after the opportune moments.

I had a switched version that I handed over, but it sucked since production could neither give the camera operators a rehearsal (not even a tape to watch...) to see beforehand or headsets so I could communicate my knowledge of the play with them. It wasn't a good situation. :(
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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 04:25 AM

I didn't, actually. I gave them the better version. The cameramen had never seen a researsal of the play before they were to shoot it, but I had. I was expected to direct the cameramen to opportune places at the opportune times to catch those great special shots but I couldn't without headsets. Since they had to wing it, the camera men were generally in the right place just after the opportune moments.

I had a switched version that I handed over, but it sucked since production could neither give the camera operators a rehearsal (not even a tape to watch...) to see beforehand or headsets so I could communicate my knowledge of the play with them. It wasn't a good situation. :(


I was running camera on a multicamera shoot where a headset fiasco resulted in EVERYONE being on the same frequency. This meant that the camera guys were hearing the call outd for the lighting and sound cues. It took well over half an hour to figure out how to seperate the camera guys headsets from everyone else, I think it actually cut into the rehearsal time for the performers.

If one can afford the slightly additional hassle, I'd set up an ultra wide shot, even if it's not being laid down anywhere, so the director in the truck can always have a reference point of the entire stage. Sometimes the wide shot doesn't reveal enough of what is happening off camera and the ultra wide camera angle can really prove useful. The sound mixer can sometimes benefit from this as well if they are not able to position their set-up where they can see the entire stage.
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#8 Chris Keth

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 09:59 AM

If one can afford the slightly additional hassle, I'd set up an ultra wide shot, even if it's not being laid down anywhere, so the director in the truck can always have a reference point of the entire stage. Sometimes the wide shot doesn't reveal enough of what is happening off camera and the ultra wide camera angle can really prove useful. The sound mixer can sometimes benefit from this as well if they are not able to position their set-up where they can see the entire stage.



I had the static wide shot set up going to it's own tape, then I filled another tape from the switcher output.
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#9 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 09:46 AM

I had the static wide shot set up going to it's own tape, then I filled another tape from the switcher output.


By ultra wide shot I meant actually seeing the sides of the stage so one can see entrances before the audience does.
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#10 Chris Keth

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 07:31 PM

By ultra wide shot I meant actually seeing the sides of the stage so one can see entrances before the audience does.


Ah, I see. I though that but didn't bother. I'd seen the production before, so I knew what was coming. Still wouldn't have helped me direct the camera operators as to what shots I want.
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#11 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 08:09 PM

Ah, I see. I though that but didn't bother. I'd seen the production before, so I knew what was coming. Still wouldn't have helped me direct the camera operators as to what shots I want.


If you have a sound guy who can't see all the entrances and exits from their vantage point it can be helpful for them.
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