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My Home Processing - Second Try


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#1 grantsmith

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 06:36 AM

Hi,


While not having that same cinematic importance of Friese-Greene I'm quite pleased with my second attempt at home-processing.

I've a few problems though.

I used 7293 (old 200t) in my Eumig 16mm and D76 B+W to process

I processed the developer at 28C for 6mins. Did a stop wash with WATER (should I have used proper stop?) for around a minute then a fixbath for 3 mins at 25C.

The neg seems quite thin but I can clearly see what I shot. Assuming the light meter is fine should I either develop for the same time at a lower temp (20C) or at the same temp for a shorter time? The stock is about 5 years old (stored in a fridge). I know color would be affected but would the image itself be, aside from slight fogging?

Also, I find it easier to take the anti-halation backing of after processing. How long after processing should I try it - and at what temperature?

I know I was told to try tri-x first but all I had lying around was this old 7293.

Still having lots of fun and learning more as there are less variable with b+w.


Thanks
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#2 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 08:53 AM

Hi,
While not having that same cinematic importance of Friese-Greene I'm quite pleased with my second attempt at home-processing.

I've a few problems though.

I used 7293 (old 200t) in my Eumig 16mm and D76 B+W to process

I processed the developer at 28C for 6mins. Did a stop wash with WATER (should I have used proper stop?) for around a minute then a fixbath for 3 mins at 25C.

The neg seems quite thin but I can clearly see what I shot. Assuming the light meter is fine should I either develop for the same time at a lower temp (20C) or at the same temp for a shorter time? The stock is about 5 years old (stored in a fridge). I know color would be affected but would the image itself be, aside from slight fogging?

Also, I find it easier to take the anti-halation backing of after processing. How long after processing should I try it - and at what temperature?

I know I was told to try tri-x first but all I had lying around was this old 7293.

Still having lots of fun and learning more as there are less variable with b+w.
Thanks


This is very good, what you begin of processing of film at home. You need study of processing of film again and more detailed.

You processing of 16 mm color negative film XRT 200 T with D76 B&W negative developer ?
And you receive result ? You lucky.
What with rem-jet backing ?
Your chemistry must be dirty.

I know not, what need answer.
I recommend you take B&W reversal films ( Kodak, FOMA ), take correct chemistry and you will receive good result.

I made test with color negative film and processing of C41 chemistry, but, I not test of color negative film and B&W chemistry.
You can check idea of use of C41 chemistry for 7293 films. Yes, this not correct idea and rem-jet layer
dirty of chemistry and film, but, you can have not bad result and to print color photo from your negative film on photo print lab.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 08:57 AM

Hi,
While not having that same cinematic importance of Friese-Greene I'm quite pleased with my second attempt at home-processing.

I've a few problems though.

I used 7293 (old 200t) in my Eumig 16mm and D76 B+W to process

I processed the developer at 28C for 6mins. Did a stop wash with WATER (should I have used proper stop?) for around a minute then a fixbath for 3 mins at 25C.

The neg seems quite thin but I can clearly see what I shot. Assuming the light meter is fine should I either develop for the same time at a lower temp (20C) or at the same temp for a shorter time? The stock is about 5 years old (stored in a fridge). I know color would be affected but would the image itself be, aside from slight fogging?

Also, I find it easier to take the anti-halation backing of after processing. How long after processing should I try it - and at what temperature?

I know I was told to try tri-x first but all I had lying around was this old 7293.

Still having lots of fun and learning more as there are less variable with b+w.
Thanks


Processing any film in a B&W negative developer should yield an image, as you found. You will NOT get a color image, even from a color film, unless a color developer is used. Your image may be "thin" because of underexposure, or underdevelopment.
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#4 grantsmith

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 04:32 PM

thank you john and olex.

I've just made try number 3. i used the rest of the film i shot earlier on. this time i extended the developing time by 2 minutes but yielded less image than before. it was almost transparent.

Could it be my light meter or as the film is 5 years old should i have overexposed a little?


thanks
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#5 Jesse Andrewartha

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 06:22 PM

thank you john and olex.

I've just made try number 3. i used the rest of the film i shot earlier on. this time i extended the developing time by 2 minutes but yielded less image than before. it was almost transparent.

Could it be my light meter or as the film is 5 years old should i have overexposed a little?
thanks


You're going to go through alot of film and chemicals with bad results until you stop and do some research. Developing color negative as a black and white neg? You need to know the rules before you break them. I'm all for you experimenting, and it sounds like you're having fun. But your questions problems are basic photoprocess issues that would be easily solved with an afternoon's reading. Get some information, try again with more understanding and you'll know what you're looking at, what you should expect to find and dramatic improvement in your results.

A personal example: I developed a hybrid C-41/E-4/C-22 for 2443 color infrared film back in 1996... definitely not standard processing, but I did one months research and formulation before I put film to bath, and then the first images were of color charts and densitometry tests... boring, but it ended with consistent results and predictable processing, and some pretty pictures.

-Jesse-
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#6 Dominic Case

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 08:26 PM

As John says, any colour film processed in a b/w neg developer will yield an image: the fundamental development principle is the same.

The colour developer works by first of all developing the silver halide emulsion to a silver (b/w) image, and then the by-product of the developer agent reacts with the colour couplers in each layer of the emulsion to form colour dyes. In a colour process, the next significant stage is the bleach bath, which removes the silver image again, leaving a pure dye image. In a black and white process, the developer still froms a silver image, but it doesn't have any effect on the colour couplers, so no dyes are formed.

Warning - don't even think about processing black and white negative in a colour process. From the above, it follows that the colour developer will produce a silver image (but no colour dyes as there aren't any in the film), then the subsequent bleach will remove that image again. Result, clear film, no image, no possibility of recovering it.

If you got a lighter image in test 3 compared with test 2, despite more development, I would guess that either your exposures were different, or more likely, the temperature of the developer was different (one degree can make a big difference), or you agitated it less. (Did you use fresh developer, or recycle your previous batch? It's possible to do that (though you'll have a big dirt problem with the remjet backing) but you have to allow more dev time as the solution gets exhausted.)
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Opal

Aerial Filmworks

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Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

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Glidecam