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Power in Zambia


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#1 Scott B. Jolley

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 02:21 PM

I am getting ready to shoot in Zambia, where the power is 220/50hz. The Battery charger/power supply for my DVX-100 has both USA & foreign listings on it. I am assuming it will atomatically read the proper voltage, right? I will get plug adapters but was not sure about a transformer. I would prefer to be safe than sorry.
Thanks,
Scott
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#2 Tracy Eakes

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 12:07 AM

I have shot in Zambia in the past. Even if you get a transformer, please take a multi-meter with you to check the voltage before you plug anything into power. My experience showed that the power in the areas would fluctuate from 240 to 315 volts. My meter would actually rise and fall. This was helped by charging batteries in a single place that had conditioned electricity. If you are moving about, this might not be possible. Better to have the transformer and not need it. The adapter plugs also differed between UK, Continental and South African plugs, so be prepared.
Cheers,
Tracy
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#3 Bob Hayes

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 12:51 AM

I?ve shot in Zambia and Zimbabwe and found power fluctuates in many places. This would sometimes screw up the charging cycle. I got in the habits of really conserving my batteries. Sometimes I?d pull them off the camera when transporting just to prevent accidental discharge. I was in the bush quite a bit.
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#4 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 05:30 AM

My experience showed that the power in the areas would fluctuate from 240 to 315 volts.


You can take computer AC stabilizer of the voltage, or device with double transformation AC-DC-AC.
Any case, 315 v too high for devices with 240 v input.
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#5 timHealy

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 09:40 AM

I am getting ready to shoot in Zambia, where the power is 220/50hz. The Battery charger/power supply for my DVX-100 has both USA & foreign listings on it. I am assuming it will atomatically read the proper voltage, right? I will get plug adapters but was not sure about a transformer. I would prefer to be safe than sorry.
Thanks,
Scott


What does the charger say on it?

if it says it coverts "100 to 240 volts, 50 to 60 hertz" to say 12 volts DC (or what ever your camera runs on) it should be OK to use in the US, Europe and other countries. You would only need and adapter for the plugs and not an adapter and a transformer all in one.

If it a US device that reads "110 volts, 60 hertz" then you need a transformer too.

Since you are travelling so far, I would bring what you would need to protect yourself. Bring a really good voltage meter that can read hertz, plenty of spare batteries, and spare chargers in case one gets burned up for any reason. Especially if there is a chance the electric supply is not consistant as Bob experienced.

Best

Tim
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 11:11 AM

would fluctuate from 240 to 315 volts.
Tracy

If it really did vary between 240 and 315 and not drop too far below 240 then one could use a 240 to 120 transformer ahead of a multi-voltage, 100 to 240 volt charger. The charger would see half the incoming voltage, 120 to 157.5 volts, well within its rating. Probably the best advice is to bring a meter, a multivolt charger, a transformer, and a bag full of adapters. A nice toy would be a 50Hz Sola 240 to 120 VAC regulating transformer. There are no electronics inside a Sola, nothing to fry, they're basically a resonant magnetic amplifier. I'm not certain how a Sola would react if the line frequency was wandering around, Sola could tell you.

Let me tell you sometime about my experience trying to keep a Beaulieu going in rural northwest India.
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Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

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