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#1 vayakg

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 08:08 PM

Hi All,
i am going to use sony f900 for the 1hour docu. so to achive best look what are the settings to set up in the camera.

reply me ASAP.

looking forward to you all
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 09:24 PM

Hi All,
i am going to use sony f900 for the 1hour docu. so to achive best look what are the settings to set up in the camera.


What does a "best look" look like in your mind? Is this for transfer to 35mm?
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 09:57 PM

"Best" is a subjective term. I might suggest that you take a seminar or workshop like the Sante Fe High Definition Workshop in order to gain a comprehesive understanding of the settings available.

The only way to figure out what is "best" for you is to first understand what all of the menus do and then test, test, test. There is no one-size-fits-all recipe if that's what you're looking for. You could certainly clear all the settings or turn off the Matrix.
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#4 vayakg

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 05:45 AM

Hi David,
Thanks for u reply and i am not going to transfer to 35 but i like to get very colour full images in the sense appert from the factory setting wht are the settings in the menu to adjust to get viberent colours.


vayakg.







What does a "best look" look like in your mind? Is this for transfer to 35mm?


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 11:41 AM

Turning ON the ITU-709 (aka "Rec 709") color preset will give you a more saturated image; any higher than that requires increasing the contrast / crushing the blacks for more of a slide film look which probably is not a good idea -- I'd use the ITU-709 matrix and do the rest in-camera with a Pola filter outdoors to reduce glare, saturated lighting, crisp images, etc. and then save any further boosting of chroma, if even necessary, for post.

I'd probably turn OFF the Black Gamma function and just use more fill light if necessary -- this will keep your shadows cleaner, less noisy.

Just use the commonly-used Gamma preset table, which is Table 4 or 5, I can't remember (they are similar.) I believe Table 3 is rather contrasty.

If your camera has an 85 filter in the "A" filter slot rather than a 4-point Star filter, then you'll find that using the "A" filter instead of the "D" filter outdoors in daytime will give you a cooler image, so if you want a little more warmth, use the "D" filter. Older models though have the Star Filter in the A setting.

If this is for TV only, most people turn ON the Detail, but at some low setting like in the -35 to -50 range. If this is for a film-out, most people either use less than -50 or turn it off altogether.

You really don't need to monkey much with the settings to get a good image.
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#6 vayakg

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Posted 07 August 2006 - 06:12 AM

Hi David,
Thanks for ur reply and i take ur advise,


Thanks again


vayakg






Turning ON the ITU-709 (aka "Rec 709") color preset will give you a more saturated image; any higher than that requires increasing the contrast / crushing the blacks for more of a slide film look which probably is not a good idea -- I'd use the ITU-709 matrix and do the rest in-camera with a Pola filter outdoors to reduce glare, saturated lighting, crisp images, etc. and then save any further boosting of chroma, if even necessary, for post.

I'd probably turn OFF the Black Gamma function and just use more fill light if necessary -- this will keep your shadows cleaner, less noisy.

Just use the commonly-used Gamma preset table, which is Table 4 or 5, I can't remember (they are similar.) I believe Table 3 is rather contrasty.

If your camera has an 85 filter in the "A" filter slot rather than a 4-point Star filter, then you'll find that using the "A" filter instead of the "D" filter outdoors in daytime will give you a cooler image, so if you want a little more warmth, use the "D" filter. Older models though have the Star Filter in the A setting.

If this is for TV only, most people turn ON the Detail, but at some low setting like in the -35 to -50 range. If this is for a film-out, most people either use less than -50 or turn it off altogether.

You really don't need to monkey much with the settings to get a good image.


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#7 vayakg

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Posted 07 August 2006 - 06:55 AM

Thanks man.




"Best" is a subjective term. I might suggest that you take a seminar or workshop like the Sante Fe High Definition Workshop in order to gain a comprehesive understanding of the settings available.

The only way to figure out what is "best" for you is to first understand what all of the menus do and then test, test, test. There is no one-size-fits-all recipe if that's what you're looking for. You could certainly clear all the settings or turn off the Matrix.


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Tai Audio

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Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Abel Cine

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Metropolis Post