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ND filter for regular daylight?


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#1 Nick Norton

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 11:45 AM

well i finally tossed some film in my canon 518 camera and when i went to shoot some test shots, the automatic exposure was either at f16 or closed. i was pointing the camera at a flower bed in bright daylight. does this sound right? i mean, i wasn't shooting at the sky or real bright colors. could the light meter in the camera be off?

and if this sounds normal, and all i need is an ND filter... will my camera's automatic exposure take the filter into account, or would i need to shoot manual and bump it up a stop?

thanks-

Nick Norton
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#2 Nick Norton

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 11:56 AM

ok i lied, i did not put film in the camera myself... i bought it and it came with a cartridge already inside.

from the outside, all i can see about the film is E160.

i guess if 160 is the ASA, then the light meter makes sense, no?

does anyone know about E160 film?

thanks again-

Nick Norton
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#3 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 02:38 PM

E160 has been discontinued for years... there may be one place to process it. NOT a good first film to use and test with. However, a 160 film is very fast for daylight, so the reading makes sense. Get some fresh E64T and use a 85B daylight filter, you will be a lot happier with the results.
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#4 A.Oliver

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 03:09 PM

Hi, when exp e160 in daylite via the 85 filter the stock become 100asa, f16 i would say is correct exp for a sun lit flower bed at 24fps, perhaps leaning towards f16/22 at 18fps. Better to try a fresher film than the old 160, though the old 160 will give you a good idea how fresh 64t looks!

Edited by k25rip, 08 August 2006 - 03:12 PM.

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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 07:41 PM

If the meter is TTL (Through The Lens) it should compensate for any filter loss, ND or otherwise.

It would be a simple thing to check -- look at what f-stop the camera is telling you before and after you put the filter on. If you put an ND.60 on and the camera automatically opens-up by two stops, then it is reading through the lens.

You can also use a Pola filter as a way of cutting down some exposure.
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