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Time Lapse questions with Arri 35-3...


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#1 Thibaut de Chemellier

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Posted 12 August 2006 - 05:44 AM

I have a Technovision MultiQuartz HS base for my 35-3. This electronic base is pretty much like the High speed Cinematography Electronic base but has a single frame position.
It seems to work fine and I will make some test in a few days but I wonder if the camera is light proof enough? Do I need a capping shutter?
What?s the exposition time, ¼ sec?
Is there a way to link the MultiQuartz base to a computer or a Palm Pilot to drive the camera?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 12 August 2006 - 08:49 AM

I have a Technovision MultiQuartz HS base for my 35-3. This electronic base is pretty much like the High speed Cinematography Electronic base but has a single frame position.
It seems to work fine and I will make some test in a few days but I wonder if the camera is light proof enough? Do I need a capping shutter?
What?s the exposition time, ¼ sec?
Is there a way to link the MultiQuartz base to a computer or a Palm Pilot to drive the camera?


Hi,

An Arri III should be light tight with intervals of 5 seconds between exposures. Much longer and a capping shutter is needed. Your camera with its small shutter opening may be much more light tight than that. Pointing a Dedo Light at the closed shutter may give you an idea of how light tight the shutter is. Testing the actual camera is always the best solution.

I think the exposure is 1/6 or 1/8 second, check out the CE website.

Stephen
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#3 Rick Garbutt soc

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 09:45 PM

The answer to all questions in very technical areas like this is "it depends."

As a general rule of thumb, (an important qualifier!) if the interval between frames is 5x or less the exposure time, you can probably get away without a capping shutter. Because conditions in the field vary wildly, I'd suggest this as a starting point only, and I highly recommend tests before serious production footage is shot.

It's one thing to be shooting time-lapse of a flower opening in a highly controlled studio environment; a lot of bets change when you go outside and start filming clouds. And they're likely to change again if the sun is in the shot, pounding right into the lens. If the sun is anticipated to enter the frame, I'd strongly recommend putting your dense NDs and Polas IN FRONT of the entire lens. Lenses focus light (DUH!) and there may be intermediary focal points within the lens where infra red can be concentrated, meaning you run the risk of the sun's head separating lens elements and the horror and heartache that comes with that. If the interval between frames is long, you can damage the front surface of your shutter or warp its metal body - remember how good magnifying glasses are at starting fires...

I WOULD VERY STRONGLY RECOMMEND anyone looking to do T/L shots with the sun in frame check out the many astronomy websites and forums for detailed advice about this. Reflex camera viewfinders can, conceivably, irreparably damage your retina if you look at the sun without proper precautions. Spare retinas are hard to come by, expensive, and impossible to install (note the irony...). Please don't endanger yours!

T/L is wonderful stuff, and 35mm is still, for many applications, the Rolls-Royce of image capture vehicles. And every shot is its own little (sometimes not so little) set of engineering problems that must be solved if the shot's to look great. If I can presume to offer four ESSENTIAL starting suggestions, they'd be:

Test. Test. Test. Testtesttest. And then test some more. Become aMAZingly familiar with your own equipment.
Take notes. Lots and lots and lots of notes. Refer to them constantly. You'll be glad you didn.
Pretend you're an idiot. (There are days when this is no stretch at all for me.) Check, double check, and then check again EVERY setting on the camera. Considering the effort involved to shoot this stuff vs a few seconds of screen time, this is REAL cheap insurance. Once you set the camera going, LEAVE IT ALONE, unless you have the delicate finger touch of a practiced forger and safecracker.
Cultivate a slight frown, and a look as though you're peering far, far into outer space to figure things otu. This may come quite naturally, as a good chunk of shooting T/L IS Rocket Science.
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