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A-minima spools


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#1 Allyn Laing

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Posted 12 August 2006 - 11:53 PM

Hello,

As my previous posting I am needing to spool some Fuji onto some Aminima cores, but hence no cores available. The rental house has a couple and the only lab we have in melbourne none. If someone could point me in the direction of some I will bear your children(you know what i mean)

thanking you

Allyn

0423 109 386
sunbake_productions@aapt.net.au
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#2 Jon-Hebert Barto

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 12:50 AM

Hello,

............ I will bear your children(you know what i mean)

thanking you

Allyn

0423 109 386
sunbake_productions@aapt.net.au


:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Yeah, I know what you mean. Can I get a picture first?

No, I'm keeding, I keed! These are special cores but I guess you knew that. KODAK makes 'em with film attached as a bonus!!! :rolleyes:

Just order one from kodak, but you're going to lose about five minutes of film or more respooling with fuji.

Sorry I can't help. Good luck, however.-Jonnie

Oh, I forgat to say...

This is a bad idea. Kodak got your back! Where Fuji be?

This is a lot of trouble that kadack can see you through....AHH, Kodak... B)
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#3 Allyn Laing

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 01:10 AM

This is a bad idea. Kodak got your back! Where Fuji be?

This is a lot of trouble that kadack can see you through....AHH, Kodak... B)


Why, please tell me more.

I realise that Kodak makes the special spools, but the fuji stock is already ordered. The director and myself have decided on fuji for a particular aesthetic.

Edited by Allyn Laing, 13 August 2006 - 01:11 AM.

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#4 Jon-Hebert Barto

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 01:28 AM

well, it all boils down to your artistic choice of emulsion. You chose fuji and not a thing is wrong with that. It just seems like a lot of trouble to respool, to me. But I may be a dolt as well...

You balanced your artistic choice with a possible hindrance and that is something people are forced to do all the time. Now that you made your choice, however, the piper has reared his head to collect on a possible logistical nightmare.That is what he does. Don't hate him for it...

Now you must wrestle him to the ground by overcoming your apparent problem like many dexterous people before you. Good luck. I hope the film comes out the way you intend and I look forward to some future posts with pics.

:) -Jonnie

Hey Allyn,

Do you have to use an a-min? It might be easier to just get a different cam. ?
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#5 Tim Carroll

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 08:28 AM

Hey Allyn,

Do you have to use an a-min? It might be easier to just get a different cam. ?


Yeah Allyn,

If the production has decided for artistic reasons that the project must be shot on Fuji, and the Fuji film is already ordered, then why go with the A-minima? It seems like you are telling us that the look of Fuji is very important to you and the director, a very valid point of view. So why make your shoot a nightmare by trying to push that film through a camera that it is really not designed to work with?

Besides the pain in the backside of trying to spool down all that film (is this a short or a feature), even if you are successful in finding enough Kodak plastic spools, spooling it all down without getting dust or fingerprints or static flashes on the film before it even gets into the camera, then you still need to deal with the flange focal distance issue, something that could make all your images soft.

Why don't you rent an Aaton XTR or LTR, or Arriflex SR1, 2, or 3? If you need the small size of the A-minima for a few scenes, then only spool down enough film for those, and have a back up plan if the footage comes out soft or dirty. But I certainly wouldn't plan a whole shoot around this method.

-Tim
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#6 Allyn Laing

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 10:22 AM

Why don't you rent an Aaton XTR or LTR, or Arriflex SR1, 2, or 3? If you need the small size of the A-minima for a few scenes, then only spool down enough film for those, and have a back up plan if the footage comes out soft or dirty. But I certainly wouldn't plan a whole shoot around this method.

-Tim


Because of budgetary restraints the A-minima seems to be my only viable option at the current time. The Rental house I am going with has offered the camera for a low price as a support measure, I also have the option to run with a SR2, which would make my face smile alot more - Accept that I need to do timelapse photography and I have not found out what the name of the unit which attaches to the SR2 is that achieves this.

It is a short Piece, I only have 2 Rolls of 400' to play with, can you please tell me more about the flange focal length issue?

Allyn.
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#7 Tim Carroll

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 11:08 AM

It is a short Piece, I only have 2 Rolls of 400' to play with, can you please tell me more about the flange focal length issue?

Allyn.


Allyn,

The flange focal distance on each camera is the distance between the flange where the lens seats, and the plane of the film gate. I do believe Aaton is nominally 42mm. But each different camera model has the FFD set to take into account the bow of the film as it passes the gate, the spring pressure of the pressure plate, and a number of other elements. And this dimension is usually plus or minus .005 of a millimeter, or about one tenth the diameter of a human hair.

I don't work on Aatons, so I am not sure what the actual FFD is on the A-Minima, but I have been told by folks who do work on Aatons that the FFD takes into account the "memory"(for lack of a better term on a bleary Sunday morning) of the film after it comes off the 200 ft plastic daylight spool.

In other words, when the film is wound emulsion out at Kodak, and sits on the shelf for a time before it gets to you, the film takes a little bit of a "set", because it has been sitting in a position where the emulsion side of the film bows out. Imagine now that film is coming down the pressure plate in front of the gate, with the emulsion side of the film (that facing the gate) bowing "out" or toward the gate. Taking into account the spring force on the pressure plate and the bow of the film, Aaton designed the FFD to put that film in exactly the right place for the exposure.

Now think about your Fuji film. It has been sitting, wound with the emulsion in, so it has taken the opposite "set", the emulsion side of the film is bowed in. If you spool it the opposite way, and don't let it sit for an indeterminate amount of time, the film will still have the "set" it did from the factory. Imagine now that film is coming down the pressure plate in front of the gate, with the emulsion side of the film (that facing the gate) bowing "in" or away from the gate. The spring force on the pressure plate is not strong enough to over ride all this bow in the film, so it can move ever so slightly away from the gate during exposure. And on wide angle shots, it only has to move in the neighborhood of thousandths of a millimeter to give you soft focus.

Make sense?
-Tim
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