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Canon 1014 Electronic


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#1 Rhonda L. McReynolds

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 05:33 PM

On the Canon 1014 Electronic, you can lock the Variable Control Ring at either 2 (1/2) or 4 (1/4) which is confirmed by the Shutter Angle Scale in the Viewfinder.

Question: If you rotate the Control Ring at a space other than 2 or 4, which cannot be locked, but is confirmed in the Viewfinder by the Scale, have you truly altered the shutter angle? What happens if you do not adjust the Exposure Scale Switch (Open, 2, or 4) along with the change in shutter angle? Would it be best to compensate for exposure by setting manually and ignoring the Exposure Scale Switch?

I realize the answer may be "It depends on what look you want" but I thought I would see the responses to gage if my "understanding" of the aperature/angle correlation is correct or not.

Thanks for helping a student!
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#2 JohnB

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 07:07 PM

I've owned and used a 1014E for many years, but haven't had much call to use the variable shutter, although it's very useful in some situations. I've always assumed that it can be set in any position, but normally one would want to close it by either half or quarter so that the aperture can then be opened by either one or two stops to get correct exposure.

From memory, when the shutter is fully open it has an angle of 150 degrees and 1/58 second exposure time. Therefore if the shutter knob is set to the "2" position, it would have an angle of 17degrees and an approx 1/120 second exposure time. So to get correct exposure, you need to open the aperture by either setting the aperture to manual and opening it a stop, or by moving the aperture button to the "2" position to let the auto exposure automatically open the shutter by a stop.

If you run the camera without a film in it, and tyhe bcak open while you point it at a light, and at the same time turn the shutter control knob, you will see the light coming through the gate smoothly increase or decrease as the knob is turned, thereby indicating a continually variable shutter.

I've not done this often, but it's usefully for getting a good aperture for controlling depth of field etc when there's plenty of light.

Cheers,
JohnB
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#3 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 10:35 PM

The "switch" functions on it's own for 3 different shutter angles. 150 degrees on top, I believe the other 2 settings are 90 and 45 degree shutters. If you set it to 1/4 you need an extra 2 stops (the meter usually compensates) and will have really sharp motion blur. You don't need to use the ring at all to switch between those settings.
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#4 Jason Nardella

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 07:51 AM

I was wondering the same thing myself about having to set the Exposure Ring to match the variable shutter setting of "2" or "4." Anthony, you say you don't have adjust the ring and that the exposure difference will be corrected automatically? Can anyone else confirm this? To recap, I want to set the shutter angle at the "2" position, for a smaller angle/more light/shaper image. Do I have to set the Control Ring at "2" as well or not?

Thank you.
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#5 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 06:59 PM

I was wondering the same thing myself about having to set the Exposure Ring to match the variable shutter setting of "2" or "4." Anthony, you say you don't have adjust the ring and that the exposure difference will be corrected automatically? Can anyone else confirm this? To recap, I want to set the shutter angle at the "2" position, for a smaller angle/more light/shaper image. Do I have to set the Control Ring at "2" as well or not?

Thank you.


Set the control ring to "2" as this informs the internal light meter that you want to shoot in that shutter mode. It's a nice feature as it allows you to do a shutter fade without the meter trying to compensate by opening the iris.
Rick
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