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shooting with tubes


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#1 ramesh

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 09:41 PM

when you shoot with tubes in films, it gives a slight green tint, how to rectify that, any correction filters for that
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#2 Chuck Bludsworth

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 10:18 PM

when you shoot with tubes in films, it gives a slight green tint, how to rectify that, any correction filters for that


Hi Ramesh-
You can either replace the fluorescent tubes with color correct ones-available for rent from your local grip/lighting house- or you can wrap the tubes in magenta gel to neutralize the green.

The density of the gel depends on how green the tubes are. You really need a color meter to determine this.

See the ASC's cinematographers manual for a full explanation of color temperature.

Good Luck-

Chuck
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#3 Jeremy_Graham_Gaffer

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 10:43 PM

Often times with flourescents, when there's too many to replace (or you do not have the budget to rent color correct kino tubes), my DP and I will often color correct to the green spike in the flourescents, which can then be dialed out in the telecine process. Unfortunately, if you have a bunch of windows, that's a cost-prohibitive option (full green gel costs money, too), as all of the windows would have to be gelled as well. I guess it's really a matter of taste really. Any which way around, it's gonna cost some money on the front end or the back end. Up front, you're either paying for tubes or gel, in post, you're paying for color-correction. Or, as I've seen some DP's do, you can call it a stylistic choice to let everything just spike at what it spikes at and have no white reference.
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#4 Chris Pritzlaff

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 02:10 AM

I found that it is difficult to correct florescents with gels. Often the minus-green (magenta) doesn't make the light a true 3200deg K and has a color shift to it. With the relatively low cost of the keno tubes, its not that difficult to change out the floursescents for color corrected bulbs. Most rental houses are willing to let em go out for really cheap if they have lots of them lying around.
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#5 Andrew Koch

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 04:01 AM

Hi Ramesh-
You can either replace the fluorescent tubes with color correct ones-available for rent from your local grip/lighting house- or you can wrap the tubes in magenta gel to neutralize the green.

The density of the gel depends on how green the tubes are. You really need a color meter to determine this.

See the ASC's cinematographers manual for a full explanation of color temperature.

Good Luck-

Chuck


A color temperature meter will not help you in this situation. It won't tell you the color temperature of the flourescent tubes because standard flourescent tubes don't have a color temperature. The green is a spike in the color spectrum that will confuse the meter. Different tubes have different amount of green spike and you must shoot tests to find this out. Kino Flo's technically do not have color temperatures either, but they have been thoroughly tested and calibrated to achieve the accurate look of 3200, 2900, 5500, etc... Just beware that when you put any gel or diffusion material in front of a kino flo, it's "color temperature" can and often will shift a little bit.
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#6 James Brown

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 04:10 AM

I found that it is difficult to correct florescents with gels. Often the minus-green (magenta) doesn't make the light a true 3200deg K and has a color shift to it. With the relatively low cost of the keno tubes, its not that difficult to change out the floursescents for color corrected bulbs. Most rental houses are willing to let em go out for really cheap if they have lots of them lying around.


Hi,

Dont know about you but 4 foot Kinos are $70AU each here, and when you need to replace anywhere between 5-30 in a Hospital/Supermarket it becomes quite expensive. There is such a thing here as "Phillips 930's and 950's" 4 Foot and 2 foot Daylight and Tungsten balanced tubes for a cost of $7AU each. The daylight balanced tubes start out green but warm up to speed within about 5 minutes.

James.
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