Jump to content


Photo

pushing 7285 100d


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 francisco soriano

francisco soriano

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Director

Posted 13 August 2006 - 10:24 PM

Im shooting a short on 7285 100D reversal.. I'd love to hear from anyone who has shot on this stock and how things turned out..

I have some scenes indoors which I plan to light using daylight from large windows as well as daylight balanced kino flos and some china balls with daylight bulbs. Im getting the daylight bulbs from the hardware store.. does anyone have any experience shooting with these types of daylight bulbs (sylvania daylight)? or if you could suggest a good daylight balanced screw in light bulb.. Unfortunately we do not have the budget or time for test shoots..

Can anyone suggest a good place in New York City that does quality E-6 processing.. I've had some bad experiences in the past processing reversal stock.. I was also planning on pushing 1 stop on some rolls.. is this something that this stock can handle or will it become too grainy.. Im looking for a surreal, nostalgic, vintage look with minimal grain.. hopefully rich blacks and super saturated primary colors.. Let me know whats up..

Looking forward to hearing everyones experiences with this.. Any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  • 0

#2 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 14 August 2006 - 03:53 PM

Im shooting a short on 7285 100D reversal.. I'd love to hear from anyone who has shot on this stock and how things turned out..

I have some scenes indoors which I plan to light using daylight from large windows as well as daylight balanced kino flos and some china balls with daylight bulbs. Im getting the daylight bulbs from the hardware store.. does anyone have any experience shooting with these types of daylight bulbs (sylvania daylight)? or if you could suggest a good daylight balanced screw in light bulb.. Unfortunately we do not have the budget or time for test shoots..

Can anyone suggest a good place in New York City that does quality E-6 processing.. I've had some bad experiences in the past processing reversal stock.. I was also planning on pushing 1 stop on some rolls.. is this something that this stock can handle or will it become too grainy.. Im looking for a surreal, nostalgic, vintage look with minimal grain.. hopefully rich blacks and super saturated primary colors.. Let me know whats up..

Looking forward to hearing everyones experiences with this.. Any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


7285, like most EKTACHROME films, will respond well to a push process. Expect some loss of D-Max, and some increase in graininess. For high saturation, normal exposure is best.

Not all of the new "daylight" tungsten-filament bulbs produce light near 5500K daylight. Some use bluish glass or a coating to make the light bluer, but not necessarily true "daylight"...test, Test, TEST!
  • 0

#3 Paul M. Sommers

Paul M. Sommers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 14 August 2006 - 11:04 PM

The low end will go to muddy pretty quickly once you push this stock. I have had to push it two stops on occaision, and found that about 2 stops under key you really start to lose detail. If the walls are dark tones forget about it. Shooting 85 really gives you some respect for the masters of the 50's, 60's and 70's. This stock makes it's own contrast, if you embrace it it will be your friend. If you light like you are shooting 18 you will either be very dissappointed or very happy, depending on how contrasty you want your image to be.

I'm going to be shooting 85 cross-prossess push 3 next week for about 4 days on an episode of my show. I'll let you know how it goes.

Paul M. Sommers
  • 0

#4 francisco soriano

francisco soriano

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Director

Posted 19 August 2006 - 01:53 AM

The low end will go to muddy pretty quickly once you push this stock. I have had to push it two stops on occaision, and found that about 2 stops under key you really start to lose detail. If the walls are dark tones forget about it. Shooting 85 really gives you some respect for the masters of the 50's, 60's and 70's. This stock makes it's own contrast, if you embrace it it will be your friend. If you light like you are shooting 18 you will either be very dissappointed or very happy, depending on how contrasty you want your image to be.

I'm going to be shooting 85 cross-prossess push 3 next week for about 4 days on an episode of my show. I'll let you know how it goes.

Paul M. Sommers


Cant wait to hear how that goes! Dropped my film off for processing today.. I'll let you guys know how it turned out on Monday..
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Visual Products

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment