Jump to content


Photo

Di - how much $$$


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 David Willis

David Willis

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Director
  • Los Angeles

Posted 14 August 2006 - 07:17 AM

How much does it cost for a DI on a 35mm film? I meant what's the cheapset for a 100 minute feature?

Need to finish for a 35mm release print. It's a romantic comedy with a lot of daylight exteriors and colorful costumes, I want it bright and playful.

thanks
  • 0

#2 Michael Most

Michael Most
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 765 posts
  • Other

Posted 14 August 2006 - 08:34 AM

How much does it cost for a DI on a 35mm film? I meant what's the cheapset for a 100 minute feature?

Need to finish for a 35mm release print. It's a romantic comedy with a lot of daylight exteriors and colorful costumes, I want it bright and playful.

thanks


There have been many, many threads on this. Search the archives.

As for "the cheapest," you get what you pay for.
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 14 August 2006 - 12:35 PM

Did you shoot the movie in such a way as to not need a D.I. -- i.e. you can just contact print it?

D.I.'s tend to be one of those things that if you have to ask the price, you probably can't afford it. Especially if all you want is a couple of prints! You have to think of them as part of a whole delivery system when you will be required to create an HD master, IP's & IN's, release prints because otherwise, the sticker shock is incredible.

Let's just say that a "traditional" D.I. at minimum is going to cost you at least $100,000. You basically are paying for:

(1) scanning the camera rolls
(2) conforming the scans to match the offline edit
(3) building transition efx like fades & dissolves, importing graphics like titles
(4) color-correction
(5) dirt & dust removal
(6) film recording to 35mm
(7) check-printing
(8) downconversions from the digital master for home video masters

Some costs are based on the amount of footage, while others are based on the amount of time needed, which can vary more radically. For example, if your color-correction sessions are costing you $4000/day, it's going to make a big difference whether you take 5 days, 10 days, or 20 days to color-correct the movie. On the other hand, laser recording the final 100 minute feature to a 35mm I.N. tends to be more of a known cost, somewhere in the $50,000 range, maybe more, maybe less.

Now there are shortcuts in cost & quality, some minor, some major. The next step below 2K data as the digital format is HD, and 4:4:4 HDCAM-SR as the intermediate format is becoming a popular choice for people who can't afford 2K. Laser Pacific has a whole 4:4:4 HD D.I. system in place.

But even that's not much cheaper. You'd have to start getting into the compressed 4:2:2 HD tape formats and desktop color-correcting to really start saving money, and then maybe also a cheaper film recorder like an older Celco going out to camera original stock.
  • 0

#4 Matt Goldberg

Matt Goldberg
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 10 September 2006 - 11:40 PM

You're absolutely right, David. Quotes and structures of DI's have such a large range, and currently there simply isn't a universal 'quote' structure-- some quotes will include one service, such as the film recording itself, and others leave it out. That said, DI costs can be difficult to assess, given what is included, and what is not.

Some film recorders, I believe, can actually record to particular print stocks, which may or may not be a useful purpose-- I guess that just depends on the production and if that is really needed.
  • 0

#5 Nate Yolles

Nate Yolles
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 112 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 29 September 2006 - 01:00 PM

Now there are shortcuts in cost & quality, some minor, some major. The next step below 2K data as the digital format is HD, and 4:4:4 HDCAM-SR as the intermediate format is becoming a popular choice for people who can't afford 2K. Laser Pacific has a whole 4:4:4 HD D.I. system in place.



I've been speaking with Laser Pacific about their InDI program (the 4:4:4 HD DI) and they're telling me the quality is just below a 2K, noticable only to the trained eye. Does anyone have any experience with this process. What is the quality difference between the InDI and a 2K?
  • 0

#6 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 29 September 2006 - 01:48 PM

I've been speaking with Laser Pacific about their InDI program (the 4:4:4 HD DI) and they're telling me the quality is just below a 2K, noticable only to the trained eye. Does anyone have any experience with this process. What is the quality difference between the InDI and a 2K?



Hi,

I am sure Laser Pacific can show you some comparison tests.

Stephen
  • 0

#7 Nate Yolles

Nate Yolles
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 112 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 29 September 2006 - 01:54 PM

Hi,

I am sure Laser Pacific can show you some comparison tests.

Stephen


They can and they will. However, I'd like some outside professional opinions.
  • 0


Opal

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Abel Cine

CineTape

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Opal

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc