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tungsten converter HELP?!!


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#1 spazboy

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 11:49 AM

I have the Bolex EBM camera. And, I actually have an
85 gel insert that goes into the side of the camera
(BEFORE THE LENS). I'm wondering if this will convert
my tungsten film the same way as if I bought the
Tiffen 85 filter that screws on the END of the lens.

Same effect??

Or...what are any discrepenciees or differences by
using one or the other?
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 05:05 PM

I have the Bolex EBM camera. And, I actually have an
85 gel insert that goes into the side of the camera
(BEFORE THE LENS). I'm wondering if this will convert
my tungsten film the same way as if I bought the
Tiffen 85 filter that screws on the END of the lens.

Same effect??

Or...what are any discrepenciees or differences by
using one or the other?


The 85 gel that fits into the camera's filter holder does the same job as using a 85 filter in front of the lens.
The gel filter is extremely high quality (it's not a lighting gel, it's a high quality photographic filter). The down side is that's delicate, easily marked and this can show in the frame. BTW Always have a filter holder in the slot (even if a filter isn't being used), otherwise you'll get fogging.
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#3 spazboy

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 09:56 AM

thanks for the asssistance.

wheres the best place online that I could grab
another insert gel because I think mine is actually
marked up enough that its gonna show.

would this work well?

http://www.rockcamer...om/new47628.jpg
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 10:36 AM

would this work well?

http://www.rockcamer...om/new47628.jpg



That's the type of filter used, just be careful when cutting it to size. Although, don't use an 85C for conversion to tungsten.

Edited by Brian Drysdale, 15 August 2006 - 10:37 AM.

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#5 spazboy

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 11:41 AM

you'd use a blue 80, right!?
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#6 George White

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 11:12 PM

I have a Beaulieu super 8 camera that also has an internal filter. I asked the person who overhauled it for me if it would be better to remove it and use a filter on the front of the lens (I thought it would give me more flexibility). He told me that while the internal filter is in the light path to the film, it is not in the path to the viewfinder and thus has the advantage of not making the viewfinder less bright. I beleive the Bolex shares this characteristic (according to logic & an on-line manual I found). If so, it is a big advantage to use the internal filter.

---george


Same effect??

Or...what are any discrepenciees or differences by
using one or the other?


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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 05:40 AM

you'd use a blue 80, right!?


If you want to use tungsten film in daylight you'd use either an 85 or 85B. Usually, the 85 with neg and the 85B with reversal, although you can use the 85B with both - it just seems a tad warm with the neg, but it's a personal taste thing.

On the Bolex cameras I've used the internal filter is in front of the viewfinder prism block, so that will cut the light going to the V/F.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 12:17 PM

If you want to use tungsten film in daylight you'd use either an 85 or 85B. Usually, the 85 with neg and the 85B with reversal, although you can use the 85B with both - it just seems a tad warm with the neg, but it's a personal taste thing.

On the Bolex cameras I've used the internal filter is in front of the viewfinder prism block, so that will cut the light going to the V/F.


85B is the correct filter to convert 5500K to 3200K. An 85 corrects 5500K to 3400K -- it's just that it's close enough for negative, whereas with reversal shot for direct projection, you need to get it right.

The 85 is the correct filter for Type-A reversal films like K40, which is balanced for 3400K. The 85B is the correct filter for Type-B reversal films like Ektachrome 64T, which is balanced for 3200K. Some old reversal stocks were balanced for 3400K because that's what Photoflood bulbs burn at.
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#9 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 06:25 PM

85B is the correct filter to convert 5500K to 3200K. An 85 corrects 5500K to 3400K -- it's just that it's close enough for negative, whereas with reversal shot for direct projection, you need to get it right.

The 85 is the correct filter for Type-A reversal films like K40, which is balanced for 3400K. The 85B is the correct filter for Type-B reversal films like Ektachrome 64T, which is balanced for 3200K. Some old reversal stocks were balanced for 3400K because that's what Photoflood bulbs burn at.


Absolutely.

Although, when I used the 85B for both reversal and negative stocks, on the negative I found the print tended to be a bit warmer than I liked. I know one cameraman who used to shoot with the 81EF instead of the 85 for correction - this was one of the older stocks. Then did the final correction in the grade.
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