Jump to content


Photo

16mm feature films


  • Please log in to reply
37 replies to this topic

#1 Arc

Arc

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 August 2006 - 07:23 AM

The only 16mm movie i am aware of that was transfered to 35mm is "Leaving Las Vegas".

Does anybody know of any movie that were shot in 16 or super 16 and transfer to 35mm? I want to see if 16mm is a good alternative.

Also

What does it look better on a 35mm release print a movie shot on super 16mm or a DV or HDV ??

how about costs? which one is cheaper?

thanks guys
  • 0

#2 Tomas Stacewicz

Tomas Stacewicz
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Other
  • Gothenburg, Sweden

Posted 15 August 2006 - 07:48 AM

Films shot on Regular 16 and Super 16:

Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Romper Stomper
Pi

About costs, DV is the cheapest and 35 mm the most expensive. But who wants to shoot on video?

In my opinon, 16 mm is a good compromise between production cost and picture quality.
  • 0

#3 Arc

Arc

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 August 2006 - 07:53 AM

yes i know DVi s cheapest and i also prefer film

but my question is: Does super 16mm look better than dv and hdv when transfered to 35mm?

whats the resolution difference?

Moreover whats the resolution difference between hdv and dv?

thanks guys
  • 0

#4 Tim Carroll

Tim Carroll
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2165 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, Illinois

Posted 15 August 2006 - 08:00 AM

Does super 16mm look better than dv and hdv when transfered to 35mm?


Absolutely! For more information, please use your real name on the forums and include where you are in the world in your signature.

-Tim
  • 0

#5 Hans Engstrom

Hans Engstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Sweden

Posted 15 August 2006 - 09:08 AM

And it would look better if you changed what you do for a living because if DOP actually was your profession you wouldn´t have to ask theese questions.
  • 0

#6 Arc

Arc

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 August 2006 - 10:22 AM

dear Mr. Hans Engstrom:

If u dotn like my questions you are more than welcome not to answer them.

I am sure that all of us even the most advanced DOP haev questions because cinematography is not a science but an "art".

This is forum to exchange ideas and concepts freely. Your swedish pride does nothing to promote the exchange of ideas.

My message to you: SHUT UP!!!

Films shot on Regular 16 and Super 16:

Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Romper Stomper
Pi

About costs, DV is the cheapest and 35 mm the most expensive. But who wants to shoot on video?

In my opinon, 16 mm is a good compromise between production cost and picture quality.



Thanks I will make sure to rent those movies.
  • 0

#7 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 15 August 2006 - 10:38 AM

You can go onto the IMDB and search under "Super 16" (not Super-16 or Super-16mm) -- go to "more searches" and do a word search under the "Technical" category.

You'll find a big list of features shot in Super-16, many blown-up to 35mm for release. There are probably 2000 or more entries that come up.

Recent examples include: Hustle & Flow, Raising Victor Vargas, Ballad of Jack & Rose, Devil's Rejects, Never Die Alone...

There are also many TV shows shot in Super-16.

The quality is quite good, only just a little softer and grainier than 35mm. Generally much, much better than DV.

As far as professional-level HD vs. Super-16, there are some advantages and disadvantages to each. HDV is somewhat closer to the DV look but without the lower resolution.

DV is standard def, either 720 x 480 pixels (NTSC) or 720 x 560 pixels (PAL.) HDV can either be 1280 x 720 pixels, or 1920 x 1080 pixels. Although this doesn't mean a whole lot since many of these HDV cameras uprez internally when you record to 1080P or 1080i, for example.

Film doesn't have a pixel resolution, but you can transfer it to any digital format.
  • 0

#8 Hans Engstrom

Hans Engstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Sweden

Posted 15 August 2006 - 11:42 AM

dear Mr. Hans Engstrom:

If u dotn like my questions you are more than welcome not to answer them.

I am sure that all of us even the most advanced DOP haev questions because cinematography is not a science but an "art".

This is forum to exchange ideas and concepts freely. Your swedish pride does nothing to promote the exchange of ideas.

My message to you: SHUT UP!!!
Thanks I will make sure to rent those movies.


If you dont know if DV or s16 will look better on the big screen and asking if S16 is a viable option, DOP yeah sure. And still no real name in your posts. As to the insults I wont even go there.
  • 0

#9 Kevin Masuda

Kevin Masuda
  • Sustaining Members
  • 209 posts
  • Director

Posted 15 August 2006 - 03:32 PM

El Mariachi was shot in 16mm.


Kev
  • 0

#10 David Sweetman

David Sweetman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 August 2006 - 04:39 PM

I am sure that all of us even the most advanced DOP haev questions because cinematography is not a science but an "art".


But declaring that you are a DP implies you've actually shot something and seen the results. If you've seen the results first-hand, you don't have to ask the question. It's apparent that you haven't really shot anything or even read many books just by the question. Plus the part you're asking about is science, not art. It's used for art, but it's still science.
  • 0

#11 Scot McPhie

Scot McPhie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 211 posts

Posted 15 August 2006 - 04:52 PM

I think the thing is unlike a lot of other forums on the net this one actually tries to mainatain a level of decorum and professionalism - mainly due in part to the high number of real pro's who post here - hence the preference for real names and titles.

Take these criticisms on the chin - you can only benefit from them.

One thing to watchout for with HDV is it's appalling colour compression scheme which gives you very little room to move in post.

Best of luck

Scot
  • 0

#12 Andy_Alderslade

Andy_Alderslade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1055 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK

Posted 16 August 2006 - 05:54 AM

I think the thing is unlike a lot of other forums on the net this one actually tries to mainatain a level of decorum and professionalism - mainly due in part to the high number of real pro's who post here - hence the preference for real names and titles.

Take these criticisms on the chin - you can only benefit from them.

One thing to watchout for with HDV is it's appalling colour compression scheme which gives you very little room to move in post.

Best of luck

Scot


When you see HDV used on television is looks very similar to DV, infact much closer to DV than to a proffesional video format like DigiBeta.

When you see HDV used on television is looks very similar to DV, infact much closer to DV than to a proffesional video format like DigiBeta.


Oh and some super 16 films:

Vera Drake
My Summer of Love
Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels


and some 16mm films:

Following
Clerks
Bad Taste
  • 0

#13 A. Whitehouse

A. Whitehouse
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 267 posts
  • Director
  • Melbourne

Posted 16 August 2006 - 07:06 AM

I saw a super 16mm french feature the other night called "sheitan" which was all shot on a A-Minima and it looked great. Digital post path though. Lots of television is on super-16 aswell.
  • 0

#14 David Sweetman

David Sweetman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Student

Posted 16 August 2006 - 07:19 AM

Following


Yeah! Take a look at this one, great-looking contemporary B&W and a great story to boot. Also, I recall that my film teacher mentioned it was shot with virtually no crew.
  • 0

#15 Jan Weis

Jan Weis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 158 posts
  • Student
  • Uppsala, Sweden

Posted 16 August 2006 - 07:26 AM

Super-16:

Tigerland

The Station Agent
  • 0

#16 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 16 August 2006 - 09:23 AM

I saw a super 16mm french feature the other night called "sheitan" which was all shot on a A-Minima and it looked great. Digital post path though. Lots of television is on super-16 aswell.



You can find almost any of the films of the famous French New Wave and they're probably on 16mm.
  • 0

#17 Josh Hill

Josh Hill
  • Sustaining Members
  • 258 posts
  • Other
  • New York, NY

Posted 16 August 2006 - 10:27 AM

Tigerland was actually shot on regular 16 to be more grainy. They say that on the commentary at some point (or maybe it is the featurette that comes on the DVD). But it is regular 16, not Super. I think it looks brilliant and is effective, so they probably went with the right choice (rather than finding some other way to enhance the grain factor).
  • 0

#18 Steve Wallace

Steve Wallace
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 163 posts
  • Other
  • Burbank, CA

Posted 16 August 2006 - 10:39 AM

You can find almost any of the films of the famous French New Wave and they're probably on 16mm.

I was under the impression most of the famous New Wave pictures were shot 35mm, using either the Eclair Camflex, or the Arri II. I've seen photos of Godard and Truffaut that confirm this as well...

Now there are a couple hundred New Wave pictures that are not so famous, and I can't comment on those
  • 0

#19 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 16 August 2006 - 11:38 AM

I was under the impression most of the famous New Wave pictures were shot 35mm, using either the Eclair Camflex, or the Arri II. I've seen photos of Godard and Truffaut that confirm this as well...

Now there are a couple hundred New Wave pictures that are not so famous, and I can't comment on those


Some of Truffaut's early features were 35mm b&w CinemaScope ("400 Blows", "Jules & Jim", etc.)
  • 0

#20 Andy_Alderslade

Andy_Alderslade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1055 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK

Posted 16 August 2006 - 01:24 PM

Some of Truffaut's early features were 35mm b&w CinemaScope ("400 Blows", "Jules & Jim", etc.)


Truffaut's first 3 films were shot in scope, 400 Blows (The first New wave film), Shoot the Piano Player, and Jules et Jim. After that, The Soft Skin (really underated, watch it!) was shot on an Eclair Camaflex but on 35mm. As far as I know (and Truffaut I know a fair bit - my undergraduate dissertation was on his films) all his films were 35mm, except his short-film Les Mistons before the 400 Blows which was 16mm.

Godard's debut Breathless, and Claude Chabrol's debut Le Beau Serge were both 35mm, infact i've seen loads of New wave films (in uni I did nothing else) and can't remember a single one that originated in 16mm.

I think the confusion maybe because, many directors would shoot 16mm for their shorts on the Eclair Camaflex and then latter shoot features on 35 on the same camera.

Yeah! Take a look at this one, great-looking contemporary B&W and a great story to boot. Also, I recall that my film teacher mentioned it was shot with virtually no crew.


I think Nolan had a sound guy, a designer, a producer (his wife) and the cast. Apparently he shot it all handheld because he found the tripod to heavy! But its a great film, one of the few no-budget films which actually stands out as a cutting edge drama, and not just an achievment in no budget filmmaking.

Edited by Andy_Alderslade, 16 August 2006 - 01:26 PM.

  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

The Slider

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Glidecam

CineTape