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Shoot Time with 400' of film


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#1 Jimmy Ren

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 04:02 PM

Hi. I was wondering if anyone could tell me how much shooting time you have with 400' of 16mm film? assuming that you're shooting at 24 fps.

also, why are so many cameras sync'able at both 24fps and 25fps? what's the difference? why would one choose one over the other?

thanks!
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 04:18 PM

Hi. I was wondering if anyone could tell me how much shooting time you have with 400' of 16mm film? assuming that you're shooting at 24 fps.

also, why are so many cameras sync'able at both 24fps and 25fps? what's the difference? why would one choose one over the other?

thanks!


Hi,

Nearly 11 minutes usable. 24 FPS is cinema 25FPS is PAL TV.

Stephen
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#3 Jason Debus

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 04:20 PM

Kodak has a handy film calculator:

http://www.kodak.com...Calculator.html
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#4 Dan Horstman

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 04:32 PM

Hi. I was wondering if anyone could tell me how much shooting time you have with 400' of 16mm film? assuming that you're shooting at 24 fps.

also, why are so many cameras sync'able at both 24fps and 25fps? what's the difference? why would one choose one over the other?

thanks!


16mm shot at 24 frames per second runs at 36 feet per minute...so divide your total feet by 36 to get the running time.
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#5 Jimmy Ren

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 06:01 PM

Hi,

Nearly 11 minutes usable. 24 FPS is cinema 25FPS is PAL TV.

Stephen



thanks everyone! that helps. some receptionist from a processing lab told me that 400' 16mm rolls are about 30 minutes @ 24fps. that didn't sound right for some reason.

here's a follow up question: if i plan to shoot and telecine it and edit it digitally with sync sound, what fps should i film at? 24 or 25?
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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 09:49 AM

thanks everyone! that helps. some receptionist from a processing lab told me that 400' 16mm rolls are about 30 minutes @ 24fps. that didn't sound right for some reason.

here's a follow up question: if i plan to shoot and telecine it and edit it digitally with sync sound, what fps should i film at? 24 or 25?



If you're in a PAL country it's easier with 25 fps, US would be easier with 24 fps.
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#7 Dan Horstman

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 11:15 AM

If you're in a PAL country it's easier with 25 fps, US would be easier with 24 fps.


If you are in North America (or any conuntry on Alternating Current) shoot at 24. If you are in Europe (or any country on Direct Current) use 25.
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#8 Mark Dunn

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 01:12 PM

If you are in North America (or any conuntry on Alternating Current) shoot at 24. If you are in Europe (or any country on Direct Current) use 25.


Everyone uses AC. The US uses 60Hz, Europe 50Hz. So it's exactly two fields per frame here.
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#9 Dan Horstman

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 01:17 PM

Everyone uses AC. The US uses 60Hz, Europe 50Hz. So it's exactly two fields per frame here.



Sorry got mixed up.
Thanks for the correction Mark.
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