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Difussion filters on Zeiss ultraprimes lenses


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#1 Rodrigo Lizana

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 08:54 AM

I want to try new ways of difussion for the Zeiss Ultraprimes lenses. We use them mostly for commercials where a clean, sharp and contrasty look is desired but now want to explore, approach to a more "natural classic narrative motion picture" look but without killing its high quality characteristic. Any experience, comments, filters recommendations ?.

(I was personally thinking about the "Pride and Prejudice" look. I think, for what I found seing the DVD extra features, cinematographer Roman Osin used an Optimo 24-290 most of the time... The film looks sharp but not too much and warm).

Best regards

Rodrigo Lizana
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www.pixine.cl
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#2 Max Jacoby

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 10:16 AM

On 'The Merchant of Venice' the Dop used 1/8 and 1/4 Promists (both black and white) regularly. This was on top of being wide open or near wide-open most of the time. The film, which was Super 35, still looked very crisp in the theatre.
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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 11:08 AM

I've shot with the old re-housed Cooke Speed Panchro's for that slightly vintage look. Still quite sharp, I'd say, but they flare quite nicely. The older Zeiss T2.1's are also quite nice. The Zeiss T1.3's are quite soft wide open and give beautiful close-ups, but focus can be tricky.
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#4 Rodrigo Lizana

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 07:53 PM

Thanks Max. I haven´t seen that movie yet but it´s going to be the next one for sure. I think one of the AC magazines of this year talks about this movie. I believe the reason for Super 35 is based on all the DI work for a period story shot in modern times !!.

Thanks again and good luck

Rodrigo Lizana
rlizana@pixine.cl
www.pixine.cl
Santiago
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#5 Max Jacoby

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 04:02 AM

There was no DI on the film, nice photochemical blow-up that looked very sharp. There's very few CGI shots on there.
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#6 Daniel Stigler

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 11:50 PM

The Zeiss T1.3's are quite soft wide open and give beautiful close-ups, but focus can be tricky.



I worked on a musicvideo this thursday where the director wanted the look the Zeiss HS lenses have at T1.3 at close up range. They drop out of focus very harshly and the areas that are out of focus look like they are filtered with a ProMist as well.
Sidenote: i still have a headache from keeping dancing singers' eyes in focus at T1.3 and a distance of 35cm...
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#7 Jon Kukla

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 05:26 PM

Funny you should ask, I've actually just started shooting a 35mm short using the Ultra Primes and a fair amount of diffusion. Mainly I'm using a net behind the lens or white promists (though never together). I've only worked with the promists a few times before, so for a handful of scenes, I'm being bold and going as far up the scale as a #1. Mainly sticking around 1/8 to 1/2 otherwise, depending on scene, focal length, lights, and framing. I should note, though, that the Ultra Primes weren't my first choice - I would've preferred an extra stop with some Superspeeds.

If I get an opportunity, I'll try to post some frame captures in a few weeks.
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#8 Rodrigo Lizana

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Posted 22 August 2006 - 08:50 PM

If I get an opportunity, I'll try to post some frame captures in a few weeks.

That would be great. I´m planning to do a test using different soft fx filters in a few weeks after the Cinec trade show. I can post something too.

Regards

Rodrigo Lizana
rlizana@pixine.cl
www.pixine.cl
Santiago
Chile

On 'The Merchant of Venice' the Dop used 1/8 and 1/4 Promists (both black and white) regularly. This was on top of being wide open or near wide-open most of the time. The film, which was Super 35, still looked very crisp in the theatre.


I´ve got the DVD. I liked the cinematography but in some cases, mainly faces, it looked too sharp for my humble taste. There were some scenes, like the ones with a ship on the sunset or where Portia waits with the three coffins that looks magnificent. Is mainly on the medium close ups up to the close ups where they seems to need to get stronger filters to get rid of the plastic look. 21 grams was shoot with ultra Primes I believe and it doesn´t feel like a super budget commercial. anyway, thanks Max for the tip, I really liked Shylock !

Rodrigo Lizana
rlizana@pixine.cl
www.pixine.cl
Santiago
Chile
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