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250D or 400T?


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#1 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 08:10 PM

If I'm doing a telecine transfer for something that will live in the digital world:

is it wise to use a lower con stock? If so, what major differences exist between Kodak 250D and 400T, as well as the Fugi compliments to these?

The main subjects in the frame will be a man and a woman in a passionate situation (It's a cologne commercial). I want it to feel very slick and warm.

The other option I was considering was using an ultracon. If I do, would it be a poor choice to also over expose by 2/3rds of a stop for a dense negative?

Thanks for the suggestions.

Chris
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 08:49 AM

If I'm doing a telecine transfer for something that will live in the digital world:

is it wise to use a lower con stock? If so, what major differences exist between Kodak 250D and 400T, as well as the Fugi compliments to these?

The main subjects in the frame will be a man and a woman in a passionate situation (It's a cologne commercial). I want it to feel very slick and warm.

The other option I was considering was using an ultracon. If I do, would it be a poor choice to also over expose by 2/3rds of a stop for a dense negative?

Thanks for the suggestions.

Chris


Really, any of the KODAK VISION2 color negative films should be able to produce the "look" you want, especially since you are transferring the images:

http://www.kodak.com...s...4.4.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com.../...1.4.3&lc=en

I agree that a lower contrast stock like KODAK VISION2 Expression 500T would be a good choice:

http://www.kodak.com...s....4.14&lc=en

Soft Natural Colors and Less Grain.
KODAK VISION2 Expression 500T Color Negative Film 5229 / 7229 is a low-contrast, low-color film. With soft, smooth flesh tones and superb shadow detail, Expression film provides a subtle, accurate image rendition at a 500 speed. And with greatly reduced grain, more flexibility in post, and cleaner images from under-to over-exposure, Expression 500T Film is better than ever before.

The VISION2 Film family is the first line of products designed specifically for both film and digital post-production. What?s more, all VISION2 Films provide natural flesh tones, very fine grain, excellent shadow and highlight detail, and maintain neutrality through the full range of exposure. So you can convey exactly the look you intended all the way from capture to post.


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#3 Dan Horstman

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 10:27 AM

With the telecine and color correction technologoy, either of the stocks you mention will be able to give you what you are looking for.

If you want a warm look I would recomend the Kodak over the Fuji. The Fuji tends to be more blue/green than the Kodak films.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 11:26 AM

With the telecine and color correction technologoy, either of the stocks you mention will be able to give you what you are looking for.

If you want a warm look I would recomend the Kodak over the Fuji. The Fuji tends to be more blue/green than the Kodak films.


That's a cliche based mostly on the colors on the box of film. You can get Fuji to look warm and Kodak to look cool. Look at "Swordfish" shot on Fuji in golden yellow tones.
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#5 Dan Horstman

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 11:46 AM

That's a cliche based mostly on the colors on the box of film. You can get Fuji to look warm and Kodak to look cool. Look at "Swordfish" shot on Fuji in golden yellow tones.


Well, yes, you can get them to look either cool or warm. But when printing Fuji film here at Colorlab we have a special filter pack that is a minus green and minus blue that we have to use for all Fuji film because if printed at normal it will come out with a green/blue tint to it. So the Fuji film is naturally more green and blue compared to the Kodak.
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#6 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 12:49 PM

Thanks guys,

But what about the use of an ultra con while also over exposing for a denser neg? Is the filter adversely effected by overexposure (like a fog would be)?
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#7 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 07:41 PM

That's a cliche based mostly on the colors on the box of film. You can get Fuji to look warm and Kodak to look cool. Look at "Swordfish" shot on Fuji in golden yellow tones.

Back when I worked in a camera store in the early seventies we found that the cliche was true for yellow box, Green box and Orange box (Agfa) and fell down for Purple/red box GAF/Ansco..
If you are doing digital stuff, you can probaly get almost any look you want.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 August 2006 - 07:46 PM

Well, yes, you can get them to look either cool or warm. But when printing Fuji film here at Colorlab we have a special filter pack that is a minus green and minus blue that we have to use for all Fuji film because if printed at normal it will come out with a green/blue tint to it. So the Fuji film is naturally more green and blue compared to the Kodak.


Sounds more like you're just compensating for the different shade and density of the color mask it has.
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