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Respooling 16mm


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#1 Joe Sexton

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 11:30 PM

I just got done respooling some film. I had a 400 ft roll and my 400ft mag broke so I split it up into two 200ft rolls. My question is that I had to handle 200ft of it to do so, and I was wondering if this will ruin the film? I did it in a room that was completely dark and I wore some vinyl examine gloves. I thoroughly washed the gloves beforehand to remove any talc powder that was on them. Should I feel safe using this film or just write it off as a loss?
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#2 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 20 August 2006 - 01:22 AM

I really don't think you have anything to worry about. As long as the film didnt get exposed, it sounds like you got a good 400' ft there to use. Get out there and shoot it!
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#3 Dominic Case

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Posted 20 August 2006 - 11:06 PM

Presumably you remembered to wind the 200ft twice. ie back to the head, so the perfs are on the same side as they started. Otherwise you won't be able to load the camera.

If it was double-perf stock, then you would be able to load the camera, but you would find the Keykode numbers would run in reverse order, on the other edge of the film.
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#4 Joe Sexton

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 10:40 AM

[font=Arial][font=Arial][font=Arial]
Yes I did it twice.
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 12:49 PM

Proper darkroom handling of camera films:

1. TOTAL DARKNESS - let your eyes get dark adapted for at least ten minutes, then look for ANY light leak and fix it. Watch out for things like luminous watches, cell phone status LEDs, etc.

2. Keep track of orientation, or you will have perfs on the wrong side, or KEYKODE numbers that count down rather than up, and are on the wrong side.

3. Handle film by the edges only. Don't "pinch" the film so tight that it could put a pressure kink into it.

4. Watch out for static marks. Wind slowly. Electrically ground all rewinds. Ground yourself. Keep humidity near 50% RH.

5. Wind at a constant speed, with constant tension and an even wind.

6. Keep area clean. Hairs and fibers that get on the film could become a "hair in the gate".

7. Gloves are not necessary if you keep your hands clean and sweat-free, and handle the film by the edges only. If gloves are worn, be sure they are clean and lint-free. (e.g., Don't use fibrous cotton gloves).
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#6 Cohen Phillips

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Posted 22 August 2006 - 03:06 AM

Sounds like you did it right so your film should be fine. :)

I got some film I need to spool down as well. Thanks John for the tips! :D
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#7 Matt Pacini

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 07:03 PM

I stopped using gloves for this kind of thing, because I found that fibers from the gloves were being introduced into the process!

MP
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#8 David Leugers

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 07:15 PM

I agree with Matt, ditch using gloves. Clean your hands with a baby wipe before handling (only handle if at all by the edges of the film). I used to rewind film fairly often onto 100 and 200ft spools. I have an old rewind set that has one of the shafts with a slight bend to it which causes the reel to wobble a bit when turning. This is perfect to keep the film wound out against the sides of the reel to help prevent edge fog. I never had a problem and since rewinds are so cheap on eBay nowadays, it would make since to me to make a wobbler for just such a use.


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#9 Dominic Case

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 10:37 PM

To John's list of film handling tips, I'd add one more. Keep cool and clean.

If you are using bare hands (fibre-free) there is nothing worse than sweat or grease. Even handling film by the edges risks contaminating it with whatever's on your hands. Some ingredients in hand creams and various cosmetics can be fogging agents. Grease can prevent developer reacing the emulsion during processing.

And the first time something goes wrong (having the middle of a roll of rawstock drop out comes to mind), you will spend a long time in increasing levels of panic trying to rescue the film. You can perspire a lot in that situation if you are in a small, stuffy, HOT darkroom.
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#10 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 01:16 PM

Some ingredients in hand creams and various cosmetics can be fogging agents. Grease can prevent developer reaching the emulsion during processing.


Ingredients that contain mercury compounds, sulfur, or ammonia/amines are likely to be fogging agents. Wash with a good unscented liquid hand soap, then rinse and dry well.
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