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Lights in temperatures under 0º


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#1 Agustin Oroz

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 03:25 PM

We are gonna shoot on a glacier. What should i take care?
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#2 Tshaka

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 05:19 PM

We are gonna shoot on a glacier. What should i take care?


Spoke with a Director of Photography recently and he mentioned his experiences in Greenland. I think it was Greenland. He spoke very well of the lighting technicians over there.

Those guys are the experts on filming in, around and on top of ice. Apparently they have some unique methods. Grip wise I say trust the locals. A good Production Manager will hire a good Grip Crew.

A good Grip crew will work hard to help you build your photographic ideas.

Yep.

Trust the locals.

That is pretty vague isn't it? Well it is a forum. Where is this Glacier? Maybe one of those locals is reading this.

Tshaka
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#3 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 01:18 PM

No massive changes, really. HMI's can take some time to strike in very cold weather. Also, te ballast and cable connectors have to be treated as if you're on a wet set - they can melt snow when they get really hot. But if it's extremely cold, then it won't happen.

Tungsten is good in snow, if you have the power. Lighter and less sensitive. Fay lights and multiple par's, like Dino's, Wendy's, 9-Lights, 12-lights etc can go through bulbs quite quickly if it's snowing or raining.

In deep snow, obviously, you have to support the stands properly so the lamp doesn't fall over. But this is
pretty self-explanatory.

I love shooting in snow personally - think it's a joy. As long as you've got warm boots and a nice cup of tea, coffee or soup in your hand, it's a pleasure.
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#4 Agustin Oroz

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 04:51 PM

No massive changes, really. HMI's can take some time to strike in very cold weather. Also, te ballast and cable connectors have to be treated as if you're on a wet set - they can melt snow when they get really hot. But if it's extremely cold, then it won't happen.

Tungsten is good in snow, if you have the power. Lighter and less sensitive. Fay lights and multiple par's, like Dino's, Wendy's, 9-Lights, 12-lights etc can go through bulbs quite quickly if it's snowing or raining.

In deep snow, obviously, you have to support the stands properly so the lamp doesn't fall over. But this is
pretty self-explanatory.

I love shooting in snow personally - think it's a joy. As long as you've got warm boots and a nice cup of tea, coffee or soup in your hand, it's a pleasure.



Thanks for the advices and i´ll keep on mind the boots and the cup of tea!!!

Agustin
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The Slider

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Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

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rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

CineLab