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shooting b/w on colorfilm


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#1 Adam Wallensten

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 08:46 AM

Hello!

I'm on vacation in a small tuscany village where I'm planning on shooting a short (on 16mm). I have two stocks with me (fuje 64D and kodak 250D). I want to turn the film into black and white in post and I want it to have a contrasty look. Therefore I was thinking about using a redfilter, but my question is: Will the red filter have the same effect as it would have if I shot on b/w film, even though I'm shooting on color and subtracting the colors later? Or is it a bad idea and better to create the contrast in post?

Any other useful advice on this way of shooting b/w will be appreciated.

Thank you

Adam Wallensten
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 09:00 AM

There's alot of folks on this forum that know more about this than I do, but from my experience, shoot the color film straight and when you go to b&w in post, add the contrast there.

The reason a red filter works for black and white film is that it changes the color of blue sky or green follage in a way that makes the black and white emulsion more sensitive to it. B&W film is not very sensitive to the colors blue and green, so you add the red filter and then the film really picks it up.

-Tim
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 09:28 AM

Plus another problem is that the red layer is not very sharp, so you will lose definition shooting through a red filter. I'd stick to Polas outside to make the sky darker, then add the rest of the contrast in post, unless you want to go as far as to skip-bleach the negative.
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#4 Dominic Case

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 06:32 PM

The reason a red filter is sad to increase contrast on b/w films is that it darkens greens and blues, and lightens other colours.

So white clouds stay bright but the blue sky is darkened - increasing the contrastiness of the sky. And leaves of trees are darkened against the sky, while faces are usually brighter. In other words, things that we often see as darkish are darkened more.

It doesn't have the same effect with interiors where colour values of familiar objects are very different.

As David says, a polarising filter will darken the blue sky in the same way and still record a fully balanced image without sacrificing image detail..

If you grade the image very red in post, then desaturate it, you will get a similar effect. But if you just want contrast, rather than the red filter efect, simply add contrast when you grade.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider