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Ektachrome E160


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#1 Retroboy

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 01:56 PM

Hi there

I'm new to the forum and i appologise if i'm barking up the wrong tree. However i fell upon this forum by chance while searching for film for my Chinon 255XL.

I realised after registring up that this forum is most likely the home of professional film makers, alas one of which i'm not. However i would very much like to ask your assistance.

My father has as i said a Chinon super 8 camera which i remember him using in the early 80's. I've slowly been developling my own interest in film after being dissapointed with my first APS camera and moving on to a 35mm. Which give by far better results and some truly stunning images.

However i'm interested in dusting off the old super 8 and giving it a go. From what i'd read out of the manual it took Ektachrome e160 film. Is it still possible to get this film?

Unfortunatly i'm based in England and so far 95% of the more useful sites like this one are U.S based. But if anyone could drop a quick message with perhaps advice or a link i could follow to help me get started. Well i'd be REALLY grateful.

Thanks very much for reading and i'm sorry if i've posted in the wrong place.

Regard
James
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Retroboy
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 02:38 PM

These are the Super-8 films currently offered by Kodak:

http://www.kodak.com...o....14.4&lc=en

Repackagers sometimes slit and perforate other motion picture stocks (e.g., KODAK EKTACHROME 100D Color Reversal Camera Film 5285/7285) to 8mm formats.

Kodak no longer sells KODACHROME 40 or EKTACHROME 160 films for Super-8.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 03:04 PM

Chances are this camera can only take 40 and 160 ASA films, so you can probably only use Velvia, but even this is going to run out soon, I don't know, I am by no means a professional cinematographer, anyone here will tell you that.
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#4 Larry Wilson

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 09:57 AM

Hi there

I'm new to the forum and i appologise if i'm barking up the wrong tree. However i fell upon this forum by chance while searching for film for my Chinon 255XL.

I realised after registring up that this forum is most likely the home of professional film makers, alas one of which i'm not. However i would very much like to ask your assistance.

My father has as i said a Chinon super 8 camera which i remember him using in the early 80's. I've slowly been developling my own interest in film after being dissapointed with my first APS camera and moving on to a 35mm. Which give by far better results and some truly stunning images.

However i'm interested in dusting off the old super 8 and giving it a go. From what i'd read out of the manual it took Ektachrome e160 film. Is it still possible to get this film?

Unfortunatly i'm based in England and so far 95% of the more useful sites like this one are U.S based. But if anyone could drop a quick message with perhaps advice or a link i could follow to help me get started. Well i'd be REALLY grateful.

Thanks very much for reading and i'm sorry if i've posted in the wrong place.

Regard
James
aka
Retroboy


Sadly, E160 has been out of production for several years now, and they just recently discontinued the film that replaced it, Ektachrome 7240. They do make Ektachrome 64T, but I think that in order to use it with your cam, you'll need a light meter.

You could, however, check ebay for E160 (and Kodachrome 40, which was also killed off recently). They have them on there quite a bit, especially the Kodachrome. Just search for "Kodachrome movie" or "Ektachrome movie" and it'll pull up what you need. As for processing, you're still okay for Kodachrome, but I don't know of anywhere in England that still handles E160. Very few places here in the States still handle it because it's been gone so long.

Hope that helps...

Edited by Larry Wilson, 26 August 2006 - 09:59 AM.

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#5 shutter bug

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 06:11 PM

news is not bleak. you have a number of stocks out there.the ektachrome 64 being the easiest to get and have processed.make sure your camera meters for it or that you can do manual exposure on it so you can use a lightmeter.if not then consider a different camera
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#6 Retroboy

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 03:40 AM

Thank you to all that responded to my thread.


Many of you have said to check that the camera "meters for it" would anyone like to expand on this? I'm going to check the camera out little later, is there anything i should be looking for in perticular say in the manual?

Again many thanks, will be nice to start learning about super 8.
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#7 Retroboy

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 04:09 AM

For some reason i'm unable to edit my last post.

I wanted to ask about the length of the film, how long it lasts. My old man tells me that when he used it in the 70's he seems to recalled getting around 15 minutes of footage.

Also what is Velvia?

So ektachrome 64 is still being made by kodak? In theory if i pop into a kodak/camera shop in the city they might have some? or is it special order?

Cheers everyone, this endevour isn't seeming as bleak as it did
James
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#8 Matthew Buick

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 06:46 AM

Each cartridge lasts about 3 minutes, Kodak made big 200ft cartridges lasting about 12 minutes, Velvia is a 50 ASA Fuji Colour Reversal recut to Super 8 from a larger fromat, 35mm I think.

Hope that helps, Matthew Buick
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#9 Retroboy

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 08:59 AM

Hmm..i think Kodak is probably what my father used to buy..I read about films being 2 minutes long and he was adimant that they lasted longer.


Thats really helped thanks.

Can you still get the 12 minute ones? i've been looking for film, but it never says how long they are.

Cheers
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#10 Retroboy

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 01:15 PM

I did a little digging on this forum and found a list of camera's and lucky for me i found the one i'm planning to use. Though i would post the details here, perhaps to give the people helping me start out some insight to the equipment i'm using.

Again thank you all for your help and advice, it's REALLY appreciated! Before i came on here i knew less then nothing about super8 but now i'm actually getting an idea. The fact it's not easy as video isn't putting me off either. I've seen the difference in picture and i prefer 8mm film, it looks better! Admittedly my purpose is for pleasure, i'm by no means a professional. But i think having around 2-3 minutes of film forces you to think about what your filming, instead of just pointing the camera and recording 20 minutes of rubbish.


The details are:

Chinon 255 XL
From Super8wiki

Chinon 255 XL

Year: 1975-77

Weight: 1900 g

Lens: Chinon Zoom 1,1 / 9 - 22,5 mm

Microprism Focusing

Auto / Manual Zoom

Frame rates: 18, 20

Shutter degree: 220

Manual / Auto Exposure

Backlight Control

Remote control socket

Auto Recording Level Control

6 X 1,5V batteries + 6V Mercury for light meter

Made in Japan

Original price in England (in the year of introduction): £135
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#11 Matthew Buick

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 12:35 PM

Sadly, the 12 minute carts are long gone, discontinued about 1998, I believe, you would have to have a camera with an opening on the top to fit these special mags in, they're too big for the ordinary place.

Sorry, I don't know anything about this camera.
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#12 Retroboy

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 01:33 PM

Sadly, the 12 minute carts are long gone, discontinued about 1998, I believe, you would have to have a camera with an opening on the top to fit these special mags in, they're too big for the ordinary place.

Sorry, I don't know anything about this camera.



Cheers

So for editing purposes, would i be better of using 3minute carts..getting them developed and put on to CD/DVD to be edited at home on my PC?

I'm thinking that for a beginner like me, it would be easier then cutting and splicing film.
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#13 Hal Smith

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 02:15 PM

Chinon 255 XL
Frame rates: 18, 20
Shutter degree: 220
Manual / Auto Exposure

It's great that it has a manual exposure mode. That will work with a separate light meter no matter what film speeds the camera's metering is designed for.

Not having a 24 frame rate is bad, modern practice is to use 24 fps since that's standard sound speed. What's really on the camera? If it's got a variable speed knob it may be able to run 24 fps, just not calibrated for it.

The shutter angle is actually a little wider than the more usual 180 degrees. That's good, the wider angle makes the camera a little more sensitive to light. Your shutter speed at 24 fps would be 1/40th, at 20 fps 1/32nd and at 18 fps 1/30 second. If you buy a cine style light-meter you won't be able to use the frame per second speeds on it, they're based on a 180 degree shutter, you'll have to use the meter's fractional shutter speed calibrations like 1/40th second, etc.
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#14 David W Scott

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 03:16 PM

If you open the film door on the camera, you will probably find some numbers written inside, indicating what speed (ASA/ISO) of film will work with the automatic exposure of your camera. Many cameras only list two speeds: 40 and 160. Some cameras list most of the possible speeds: 40 64 100 160 250.

If your camera lists 64, then you are in luck. Buy some Ekatchrome 64T. I understand it is available in Jessop's camera stores across the UK.

If your camera is only good for 40 and 160, you will still be able to use Tri-X black and white film.

Super 8 film of all kinds can be ordered directly from Kodak, or probably through Jessop's.

For more info, check out these resources:

Super 8 Wiki

Kodak's Super 8 pages

Edited by David W Scott, 28 August 2006 - 03:18 PM.

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#15 David W Scott

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 03:27 PM

So for editing purposes, would i be better of using 3minute carts..getting them developed and put on to CD/DVD to be edited at home on my PC?


If you have a MiniDV camcorder and a computer, then get your Super 8 footage transferred to MiniDV. Use your camcorder to play back the tape, and edit with Windows Movie Maker (PC) or iMovie (MAC). This will be the simplest, fastest and best quality method to edit your Super 8 footage.

Save yourself the headache of trying to edit material that has already been burned on a DVD. The quality is poor and it's a lot more work than using DV tape.
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#16 Retroboy

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 03:25 AM

Thanks everyone for the advice

I'm going to take the camera out of the loft sometime today. If anyone is interested i shall post a picture of the camera here.

Thanks for the heads up regarding the inside door of the camera, i'll be sure to check it for any indication of the film i should use. The i think the manual said 40/160 don't quote me on that..i know for sure that it take 40.

Hal erm i'm not all that up on light meters and exposures. I simply know that with my 35mm camera, a 400 iso film is great for low light and reducing the chances of blurred images and great for a beginner like me!

I've read various times people mentioning in the forum, light meters. But i can't say i've seen or used one.

I did read somone recommending a book produced in the 70's for Super8 camera's. I might have to invest in one, unless i can find a site with some of this info.

Again, cheers all! i'm most definately getting film for my camera!

James
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#17 James Zeun

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 03:30 PM

Oh dear today doesn't seem to be going right for me..

I got the chinon out of the loft and discovered the rubber eye piece was degrading into a black icky tar..so i've had to remove it, not easy. Ended up cutting it off, so now i have to decide if i keep the camera or if it's cheaper to get a new camera with an intact eye piece..

secondly came to post my film/exposure findings here and discovered my account was none existant. I promise i've been a good lad, not swore or been offensive..Only posted here and thanked people ect..

Anyways if i've done bad please email me, it's not been intentional.

Soo my findings..the inside of the camera reads as follows

Daylight asa 25, 100
Artificial Light ASA 40,160

Cheers everyone
James
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#18 David W Scott

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 04:03 PM

Oh dear today doesn't seem to be going right for me..

I got the chinon out of the loft and discovered the rubber eye piece was degrading into a black icky tar..so i've had to remove it, not easy. Ended up cutting it off, so now i have to decide if i keep the camera or if it's cheaper to get a new camera with an intact eye piece..

secondly came to post my film/exposure findings here and discovered my account was none existant. I promise i've been a good lad, not swore or been offensive..Only posted here and thanked people ect..

Anyways if i've done bad please email me, it's not been intentional.

Soo my findings..the inside of the camera reads as follows

Daylight asa 25, 100
Artificial Light ASA 40,160

Cheers everyone
James


I had a Chinon eyepiece do the same thing. A soak and scrub with alcohol cleaned it off pretty well -- but the black rubber stained the silver plastic. I ended up staining the whole thing black so it didn't look so... odd.

Your options for film are:

Tri-X -- good for a camera test because it will definitely work, no fuss and muss.

Ektachrome 64 -- will **probably** be read by the camera as 40ASA. That means it will overexpose the film by 2/3 of a stop. If your camera has manual exposure/aperture control, then do this:

Aim the camera at your subject (a face or an 18% grey scale card will give the best results) and note what the exposure is set to.
Then, switch the camera to manual exposure, and close the aperture by 2/3 of a stop.
(i.e. if the camera read F5.6, then move the exposure 2/3 of the way towards F8.0)

Good luck!
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#19 Rhonda L. McReynolds

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 05:01 PM

[quote name='Retroboy' date='Aug 30 2006, 01:30 PM' post='124273']
Oh dear today doesn't seem to be going right for me..

secondly came to post my film/exposure findings here and discovered my account was none existant. I promise i've been a good lad, not swore or been offensive..Only posted here and thanked people ect..

I believe the administrator for the forum has been doing clean-up on dormant accounts and/or accounts that are not properly identified. That may have happended to you. You just might make sure your account meets all the requirements. The administrator's warning about this came out about two or three weeks ago.
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#20 James Zeun

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 10:51 AM

Hi there

Thanks for the heads up, i was worried that as i'm not a PRO film maker i might not be meeting the bar to be on this forum :(

My camera is only autoexposure and as for the eye cup, i discovered a very neat little thing. Get a pair of bonoculars, take off one of the rubber eye pieces..Its just about fits, but what to stick it there with? How about unibond good as nails double sided tape?

I think i solved the eye piece problem, just my dad one let me butcher his bonoculars :P

James
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