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Overexposed images - can something be done in post?


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#1 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 02:32 PM

Hi, I shot some of the scenes and they came out overexposed. In this particular scene I also used the filter option that HD100 has.

Links here are for the overexposed shots:

http://server6.theim.....ure 1.e2f.png

http://server6.theim.....ure 3.233.png

http://server6.theim.....ure 7.b6a.png

http://server6.theim.....ure 8.7b4.png





Links here are for the ones that works for me. What can be done? if nothing than at least I o won't think about it :))



http://server6.theim.....ure 9.5d3.png

http://server6.theim...=8stones_09.png

http://server6.theim...=8stones_11.png

http://server6.theim...=8stones_12.png



Thanks a lot guys
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#2 timHealy

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 03:00 PM

they look underexposed to me.

best

Tim
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#3 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 03:02 PM

Which ones do you mean Tim? Both of the groups? Second row might fall under that category but the first one as well? I'm not that afraid of underexposure, since as far as I know its always better to underxpose on video than to overexpose, and vice-versa for film.

Edited by mastroiani, 29 August 2006 - 03:03 PM.

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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 03:28 PM

Which ones do you mean Tim? Both of the groups? Second row might fall under that category but the first one as well? I'm not that afraid of underexposure, since as far as I know its always better to underxpose on video than to overexpose, and vice-versa for film.


Whether you overexpose or underexpose, once you have the image signal go into a clip mode, the information is lost forever. If there is still information, you do at least have the ability to manipulate tone scale to "stretch" out those "muddy" images.

With film, the "toe" and "shoulder" of the sensitivity characteristic are more gradual, so you won't find the same sort of harsh clipping of the extreme shadows or highlights.
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#5 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 03:30 PM

Pardon, for ignorance... whats a clip mode? And how do I find out if there is still information?

Edited by mastroiani, 29 August 2006 - 03:34 PM.

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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 03:46 PM

Pardon, for ignorance... whats a clip mode? And how do I find out if there is still information?



Use a waveform monitor. If the video signal "clips", it means it exceeds the capability of the system to handle it, losing the extremes of the tone scale.

Here is a NTSC waveform monitor display of an 8-step gray scale that is NOT clipping:

Posted Image
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#7 Kai.w

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 03:59 PM

What's gone is gone... However I sometimes find it helpful to lower the gain (white point) of just the highlights (which at first results in the clipped parts to turn a nasty grey) and then increase contrast in the highlights just to the point that the clipped parts turn white again. That way you can at least visually bring out the detail that is there a bit more.

-k

Edited by Kai.w, 29 August 2006 - 04:00 PM.

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#8 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 04:02 PM

Yeah, I think I killed my whole episode... :( :( :(
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#9 Ry Kawanaka

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 04:51 PM

They are just under different lighting environment. Ones on the top are obviously under sunny day sunlight and have quite a bit contrast. But the ones on the bottom are under cloudy sky. I don't know they really look overexposed (actually I didn't think they were too much of overexposure) but they sure look like the different lighting environment.

Ry
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#10 Alex Haspel

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 05:05 PM

they were rather underexposed.
it was a matter of about 20 seconds to roughly fix it in photoshop.
Posted Image
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#11 timHealy

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 06:53 PM

Which ones do you mean Tim? Both of the groups? Second row might fall under that category but the first one as well? I'm not that afraid of underexposure, since as far as I know its always better to underxpose on video than to overexpose, and vice-versa for film.


Sorry I was so brief. I was at work earlier.

I just thought the first group of photos looked underexposed judging by their faces. But you expressed that you were worried about them being overexposed. But all this may depend what the subject matter of your film is. If it was to take place during an eclipse of the sun say, then it may be right on.

You can bright up the white levels and brightness to make it look a little more "normal" but may add some contrast.

Generally speaking it is important to get your exposures right in the sense that you want to give your colorist some room to work. If you do something greatly wrong then the colorist may be all the way in one direction of his controls and may be limited on what they can creatively do then.

The second group looked fine to me.

Good luck

best

Tim
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#12 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 03:00 PM

They are just under different lighting environment. Ones on the top are obviously under sunny day sunlight and have quite a bit contrast. But the ones on the bottom are under cloudy sky. I don't know they really look overexposed (actually I didn't think they were too much of overexposure) but they sure look like the different lighting environment.

Ry



Thank you everyone for your advice!

You are absolutely right - they were shot in different days... and I think I inadvertently messed some of the controls on my camera (iris was fine, I checked it). But the issue is that I forgot to mention that these both scenes are from one episode and happen one and the same day in the film. That is the reason I am so worried, becasue I'd like to intercut them somehow. I know in the very end I might have an option to take the second row images (which have more contrast) and make them lighter ? But the look and contrast ration I was going for is the one that second row photos have (darker, more contrasty).



they were rather underexposed.
it was a matter of about 20 seconds to roughly fix it in photoshop.



Hi Alex, I just saw this actually. This is quite nice man. What did you do? It actually gives me hope that this footage can be saved. Thanks a lot.

This brings up another question: I plan to do color coorection/grading with a professional guy. Would he use photoshop as well? I presume, he would use Da Vinci or something similar? Am I correct? Maybe those software have similar and I hope more capabilities to play around than Photoshop?

Tim, thanks for your reply. This is my first film and I don't have editing, grading, color correction experience as of yet. I feel a lot better than something can be done. This actually brings up lots of creative opprtunities, as most of the obstacles do.

Edited by mastroiani, 30 August 2006 - 02:55 PM.

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#13 Alex Haspel

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 03:48 PM

Hi Alex, I just saw this actually. This is quite nice man. What did you do? It actually gives me hope that this footage can be saved. Thanks a lot.

This brings up another question: I plan to do color coorection/grading with a professional guy. Would he use photoshop as well? I presume, he would use Da Vinci or something similar? Am I correct? Maybe those software have similar and I hope more capabilities to play around than Photoshop?


hi

i was just fiddling around with photoshops "levels" function..

so you won't have any problem with a professional color corection guy, even on premiere 2.0, head up!

hope i could help.
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#14 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 03:55 PM

Born again man ! :) Thanks
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#15 Raymond O'Neil

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 01:54 PM

Hi friends,

I appreciate your invaluable advice and input enormously. I feel like I've seen the light at the end of the tunnel. There was no way for me to go back to the location and shoot the scenes again. I feel enormous relief that something is possible now.

I am copying down all the replies and will take it all to the colorist when we go to post.

Thank again.

Rati

P.S. If anyone else has a different opinion I am ready to listen.
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#16 Bruce Greene

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 12:43 PM

It's not really over exposed, just kind of low contrast, probably due to some setting in the camera.

It can easily be corrected to look like this:[attachment=1440:attachment]
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