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Shutter Angle


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#1 Gino Terribilini

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 01:59 AM

I've heard a lot about people changing the shutter angle and what not, but i'm still unclear as to what exactly happens to the image when the shutter angle is changed. Anybody willing to give me a crash-course on this or know of any good online publications describing it in detail? Any help is appreciated.. thanks!
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 02:29 AM

I've heard a lot about people changing the shutter angle and what not, but i'm still unclear as to what exactly happens to the image when the shutter angle is changed. Anybody willing to give me a crash-course on this or know of any good online publications describing it in detail? Any help is appreciated.. thanks!


Hi,

As the shutter angle reduces the exposure decreases so the image is sharper.

24 fps@ 180 degrees is 1/48
24 fps@ 90 degrees is 1/96
24 fps@ 45 degrees is 1/192

Motion blur is reduced, thats all!

Stephen
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#3 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 01:22 PM

It is an optical in-camera effect tool that gives a slight "judder" to the footage. When used in conjunction with different frame rates and | or push and pull processing it further impacts the "feeling"

Most people either do very short shutter (45 -10') with slightly higher frame rates and cross processing OR open shutter (180+) with slow frame rate to get a light bleeding effect

Do a search on "Thin Red Line" : "Three kings" : "Gladiator" etc for more detail and examples

thanks

Rolfe
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#4 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 05:47 AM

The whole opening sequence from Saving Private Ryan is a good example of extreme narrow shutter angles. As Stephen said, it's just less motion blur, making moving objects in frame less streaky, which in effect makes them look jitttery because the streakiness was what made the motion smooth. Bit like an old swatch book film, really.
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Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

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