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DIRECTOR OR CINEMATOGRAPHY..WHICH WAY TO GO?


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#1 richard_zon

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 12:33 PM

hey you all....my name is richard and i live and borned in venezuela,and next year i believe im going to the E.E.U.U and im going to study film,but im a little confused..becuase i really really like being in this media...but is it really worth it ?i mean, i read that living as a director is almost impossible...think lotery ( that is exactly what is posted) so i will like to know how u guys are doing in the work area? how are u doing directors and cinematographers....and which is safiest way to go....i will truly thanks ur answer...please ..

please help mua
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#2 Michael Collier

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 06:22 PM

You should never pick a job in an art based on what would be easier to make a living off of (before mass media most artist were among the poorest workers of all) Now that you can make a name that in itself has value, it may be like the lottery as to who gets fame, but its easy to make at least a decent living. You gotta first decide what you like about film. What part really draws you to the art. If its the fame or the money, you should do something else. If not it should be very easy to decide between cinematography and directing.

If your passionate about it you will work hard to beat the odds and make a living. If you really love the art, then all that hard work is easy (you won't even notice your working until you look back)
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#3 richard_zon

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 06:33 PM

You should never pick a job in an art based on what would be easier to make a living off of (before mass media most artist were among the poorest workers of all) Now that you can make a name that in itself has value, it may be like the lottery as to who gets fame, but its easy to make at least a decent living. You gotta first decide what you like about film. What part really draws you to the art. If its the fame or the money, you should do something else. If not it should be very easy to decide between cinematography and directing.

If your passionate about it you will work hard to beat the odds and make a living. If you really love the art, then all that hard work is easy (you won't even notice your working until you look back)




HEy thanks a lot..im not interested in fame at al.....i just want to be succesfull as anyone ...but im afraid of failing....maybe thats why im confused....just i dont want to fail.......thanks a lot collier
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#4 Kevin Masuda

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 07:36 PM

You shouldn't be afraid of failing because it is what makes the determined much better at what they do. Hell, some of the greatest filmmakers of our time has failed time and time again but it didn't stop them.


Kev
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#5 richard_zon

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 01:24 AM

Thanks kevin for your time...it helps a lot
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#6 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 05:27 PM

living as a director is almost impossible...


Most people involved in this industry do so because they are passionate about it, not because its a good (or easy) way to make money. Think of it this way: don't get involved unless you find NOT working as a filmmaker impossible. A lot of times you are going to have to make your own chances and really go out on a limb just to get your vision on screen, money is a compilication beyond even that.

Only you can decide if following this goal is worth it to you. Just remember that not all filmmakers work solely in production. There are tons of jobs in media that, while they may not put you in charge of a set, can be very rewarding both creatively and financially. If there is a project that is truly important to you you'll be working on it despite the lack of funding.

As for directing vs DP'ing, what is it about film that makes you want to pursue it? Is it the drama and story, the photography, having an interesting pick-up line at the bar ("Baby I'm gonna make you a star...")?

Film school is a great place to find all of this out, and by the time you get out you'll probably have a better idea of what you want to do. Don't be afraid to try new things and work in new roles, you may be surprised where you end up compared to where you think you'll go now.
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#7 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 09:28 PM

I think that the one thing that most filmschool students fail to truly consider is that working in the entertainment/film industry is more of a lifestyle choice and less about having a job. There is no doubt that one can improve his odds of finding monetary and emotional success by having undying enthusiasm, perseverence, and patience. Also knowing exactly what your career goals are is an enormous benefit as it helps you in deciding which opportunities to pursue and which to let go.

However those things alone won't ensure success or even that one will ever truly work enough in the "business" to make a living. There are plenty of very well-intentioned, skilled, and qualified people who just never manage to find or create those opportunities which would lead to a viable career. The "fear" of failure is a valid one and something that should be considered. I can't think of anyone who really wants to live in poverty just because they consider themselves an "artist."

In regards to which "job" to pursue, that really comes down to doing that which you enjoy the most. Ideally, a DP will be able to collaborate fully with a Director and have a great deal of creative input. But that isn't always the case as the Director sets those rules. A Director doesn't always have carte blanche either as he is under the limits set by budget or other extenuating circumstances. Apart from actually just going out and trying different jobs (which could take quite some time out of your life to accomplish), going to several working sets to observe the various interactions throughout the day might give you a better idea of what life would actually be like if you chose one thing over another.

Because those opportunities aren't available to most people, I'll have a book available soon which gives the reader a true sense of what life is really like on set on a day-to-day basis. Think of it as an internship in a book. Check out the website listed in my sig line for sample chapters and more details. And good luck in whatever you choose!
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#8 Dominic Case

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 11:11 PM

When you go to the movies, are you most interested in how the actors work, or what the images look like. Do you think your strength is in understanding what the actor must go through to deliver a convincing performance - and getting it from them - or is it more about understanding how to draw attention to one actor over another in the shot by use of lighting, focus or framing?

And before you graduate to either of these jobs, do you want to start out carrying revised scripts about, dealing with the crowds watching a location shoot, and getting the extras to stand where they are told? Or do you want to spend the day in a darkroom loading magazines, or making notes about the footage readng at the start and end of every shot?
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#9 ryan_bennett

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 12:08 AM

The easiest way to choose: get off the internet and produce, produce, produce as many shorts films/videos, whatever you can scrap yourself to make before you go insane. That is the only real way to choose is by actually doing. At the same time, you can be a DP for 20 years and poof, you can go into directing. Nothing is truly set in stone for all your life but definitely better to choose some path.

When you go to the movies, are you most interested in how the actors work, or what the images look like


Hahaha, that's horrible though because I do both and wonder about the sound and the editing decisions!
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#10 Jaime Toruno

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Posted 30 June 2007 - 02:49 AM

El mejor consejo que te puedo dar es que hagas lo que te gusta mas, yo siempre quise ser cinematógrafo pero di cuenta que no veo bien y que no sale la imaginación como cuando empecé a escribir y me encanto, crear personajes y los mas bacan es cuando los personajes le piden mas al escritor y tienes que poner tu imaginación y creatividad a trabajar. Desde entonces decidí en escribir y dirigir y en dos semana haré mi primer corto como director.

Así que has lo que te gusta mas pero si no tienes presupuesto lo mas seguro que por ahora tendrás que hacer las dos cosas, así que pon la creatividad a trabajar y diviértete! :rolleyes:
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#11 William A Chapman Jr

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Posted 30 June 2007 - 01:47 PM

El mejor consejo que te puedo dar es que hagas lo que te gusta mas, yo siempre quise ser cinematógrafo pero di cuenta que no veo bien y que no sale la imaginación como cuando empecé a escribir y me encanto, crear personajes y los mas bacan es cuando los personajes le piden mas al escritor y tienes que poner tu imaginación y creatividad a trabajar. Desde entonces decidí en escribir y dirigir y en dos semana haré mi primer corto como director.

Así que has lo que te gusta mas pero si no tienes presupuesto lo mas seguro que por ahora tendrás que hacer las dos cosas, así que pon la creatividad a trabajar y diviértete! :rolleyes:



Huh??
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#12 Marcos Sanz

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Posted 30 June 2007 - 02:31 PM

El mejor consejo que te puedo dar es que hagas lo que te gusta mas, yo siempre quise ser cinematógrafo pero di cuenta que no veo bien y que no sale la imaginación como cuando empecé a escribir y me encanto, crear personajes y los mas bacan es cuando los personajes le piden mas al escritor y tienes que poner tu imaginación y creatividad a trabajar. Desde entonces decidí en escribir y dirigir y en dos semana haré mi primer corto como director.

Así que has lo que te gusta mas pero si no tienes presupuesto lo mas seguro que por ahora tendrás que hacer las dos cosas, así que pon la creatividad a trabajar y diviértete! :rolleyes:


Translation:

The best advise I can give you is to do what you like the most. I always wanted to be a cinematographer, but I realized that I can't see well and that I couldn't use my imagination as when I started to write.

And I love to create new characters and I liked it more when my characters start to ask you for more development, and you have to use your imagination and creativity on you work. Since then I decided to keep writing and directing, and in 2 weeks I'm going to do my first shot as a Director.

So, do what you like the most, and if you don't have the budget, you probably have to do both, so put your creativity to work and enjoy!

________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________
Cheers

Marcos Sanz

Edited by Marcos Sanz, 30 June 2007 - 02:33 PM.

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#13 Jaime Toruno

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Posted 30 June 2007 - 06:11 PM

that is the best advice I can give. :lol:
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#14 Sascha - Sash - Seitz

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 05:04 AM

Dear Brian,

very well said. I like your philosophy / life style.

See you are on myspace. I will contact you.

Wish you luck in good old Prage.

Kind Regards

CARPE DIEM

"SASH"

Cinematographer
Director
Actor

www.sashcam.com
www.myspace.com/sashcam

I think that the one thing that most filmschool students fail to truly consider is that working in the entertainment/film industry is more of a lifestyle choice and less about having a job. There is no doubt that one can improve his odds of finding monetary and emotional success by having undying enthusiasm, perseverence, and patience. Also knowing exactly what your career goals are is an enormous benefit as it helps you in deciding which opportunities to pursue and which to let go.

However those things alone won't ensure success or even that one will ever truly work enough in the "business" to make a living. There are plenty of very well-intentioned, skilled, and qualified people who just never manage to find or create those opportunities which would lead to a viable career. The "fear" of failure is a valid one and something that should be considered. I can't think of anyone who really wants to live in poverty just because they consider themselves an "artist."

In regards to which "job" to pursue, that really comes down to doing that which you enjoy the most. Ideally, a DP will be able to collaborate fully with a Director and have a great deal of creative input. But that isn't always the case as the Director sets those rules. A Director doesn't always have carte blanche either as he is under the limits set by budget or other extenuating circumstances. Apart from actually just going out and trying different jobs (which could take quite some time out of your life to accomplish), going to several working sets to observe the various interactions throughout the day might give you a better idea of what life would actually be like if you chose one thing over another.

Because those opportunities aren't available to most people, I'll have a book available soon which gives the reader a true sense of what life is really like on set on a day-to-day basis. Think of it as an internship in a book. Check out the website listed in my sig line for sample chapters and more details. And good luck in whatever you choose!


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#15 GeorgeSelinsky

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 08:50 PM

If you want to be the boss on the set, director is the closest you can get to that. If you are willing to have some other guy look into your camera and say "No, this way, not that way", and you're fine with that, and the thought of having to work with actors makes you uneasy, DP'ing is a possibility for you.

If you want to make money, stock brokering is a much better thing to do :lol:
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio