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Telecine prices


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#1 Ryan Bates

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 06:36 PM

I got a price from Yale labs that they will charge me $175/hour for a completely supervised telecine. Does that sound suspiciously low to anyone. This is not a one-light telecine. Is this a good deal? Too good to be true?
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#2 Mark Allen

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 07:17 PM

Depends on the equipment. Different telecine machines will cost different amounts.

If it's a da vincci + spirit - sounds like a good deal to me. curious to hear what others would say.
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#3 gordon liron

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 12:11 AM

Also, even if your film is going through the spirit + Da Vinci, post houses also charge for the format your going to. $175 an hour sounds like beta or DVCAM. If its Digi-beta or HD, then its a great deal. If you've invested a lot of money into production, you may want to find the extra cash to go to HD. Probably lookin at $300-400 an hour.
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#4 Bryan Fowler

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 06:27 AM

wow, where can I get HD for $400/hr?
In Atlanta it's $700-800 to go to DVCPro HD / or disk.

I'm not saying you are wrong, just wondering where it is. I bet the flight and hotel stay would still be less than the total cost in Atlanta. Might save me a bit. =)
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#5 seth christian

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 06:43 PM

cheapest place I've found period is BonoLabs. They'll telecine your
16mm film to HD various forms and I've seen the footage first hand
and it looks good! It's a little cheaper because they only charge
for 'run time', not minimum charges like most posthouses do.

right now, I'm getting 500ft. transferred to HD on a hard drive in
QT or AVI....for about $280



www.bonolabs.com
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#6 Matt Goldberg

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 11:22 PM

An aspect that I always have thought is significant to telecine quotes is the telecine 'ratio,' i.e. the number of hours it would take to telecine over the hours of film itself. Typically this ratio is 4:1, meaning 4 hours of telecine work to 1 hour of film. Some houses have condensed this ratio with turnkey solutions such as with MTI's Control Dailies. Overall, you will see a varying range of anywhere from as low as $75 to $1900 an hour for telecine work.

This sounds like a good deal to me. However, there are too many variables to determine the value you would be getting from Yale in this instance-- experience, the 'degree' of supervision, output, audio, etc.
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#7 Frank Barrera

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 02:41 PM

"Typically this ratio is 4:1, meaning 4 hours of telecine work to 1 hour of film."

I couldn't imagine going through a feature in 6 hours. Although I've never telecined a feature I did do a color correct for an HD feature and we spent three full 8 hour days and still felt like we were rushing. I just did a telecine for a 35MM 17 minute short that I thought needed very little work and it still took 2 1/2 hours and again I felt rushed.

Could you elaborate a bit on the "4:1 ratio"?

F
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#8 Michael Most

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 03:40 PM

"I couldn't imagine going through a feature in 6 hours. Although I've never telecined a feature I did do a color correct for an HD feature and we spent three full 8 hour days and still felt like we were rushing. I just did a telecine for a 35MM 17 minute short that I thought needed very little work and it still took 2 1/2 hours and again I felt rushed.

Could you elaborate a bit on the "4:1 ratio"?


He's talking about daily transfers (i.e., no cuts, no continuity to speak of), and that figure is quite standard for that type of work.
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#9 Frank Barrera

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 04:02 PM

it was the "hourly rates" that threw me off. i always think of dailes as a cents per footage type of thing.

f

Edited by Frank Barrera, 12 September 2006 - 04:06 PM.

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#10 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 07:20 PM

In telecine, you kind of always get what you pay for. Even with a s**t-hot machine and 2K Da Vinci it can turn out terrible unless the guy is any good. I suppose you could get luckky and get an undiscovered whiz-kid colorist, but normally they're old lab rats that'll run the vectorscope as an approach to a night landing, basically.
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#11 Will Montgomery

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 09:46 PM

cheapest place I've found period is BonoLabs. They'll telecine your
16mm film to HD various forms and I've seen the footage first hand
and it looks good! It's a little cheaper because they only charge
for 'run time', not minimum charges like most posthouses do.

right now, I'm getting 500ft. transferred to HD on a hard drive in
QT or AVI....for about $280
www.bonolabs.com


I've done several HD transfers with Bonolabs. The files are of course HUGE, the cool thing is you can pull stills that look great since is a non-interlaced format and all the information to work with is great for post.

The downside is, you better be really good with your color correction on your editing software since they simply do the most neutral transfer possible.

For me, I'd much rather have a colorist fix color issues in the telecine process since the tools are so much more powerful than what's available in Avid or Final Cut. A talented colorist can make a WORLD of difference.



In telecine, you kind of always get what you pay for. Even with a s**t-hot machine and 2K Da Vinci it can turn out terrible unless the guy is any good. I suppose you could get luckky and get an undiscovered whiz-kid colorist, but normally they're old lab rats that'll run the vectorscope as an approach to a night landing, basically.

I 2nd this, and this describes Bonolabs. It may be a great approach for some people, just not for me.
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#12 spazboy

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 04:14 PM

I think it all really boils down to what your footage is for!....

like me, I do mostly music videos...so I'm WANTING to

colorize myself for my own scene reasons and having

someone color it for me is a waste of my money. I just

want the raw footage.

But, if you're doing a film or documentary or commercial

for instance...maybe those-for the most part- need to

stay colored properly, then you'll gain results by letting

the telecine house use their powerful tools.

In the end, as long as you're a good colorist, spending

much more money on them to color it for you isn't

noticed enough in the final render. And you can save

a ton of money by just doing it yourself. Unless, you've

never done it before...then let them do it..and spend

the money.

good luck
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#13 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 01:15 PM

wow, where can I get HD for $400/hr?


At SpyPost here in San Francisco it's about $470 p/hr for an HD transfer, and their demo reel on their website is pretty convincing quality wise. I'd go with them anyday.
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#14 Corey Bringas

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 02:39 PM

At SpyPost here in San Francisco it's about $470 p/hr for an HD transfer, and their demo reel on their website is pretty convincing quality wise. I'd go with them anyday.



There are many places in LA that will do an HD transfer for less then 470/hr, many of them are pretty good also. A place called CCI will do it for 325/hr. I've done a dv transfer through them for 225/hr and they were very good. LaserPacific is also a great place to go, not sure on their rates though. in regards to the 175/hr. there is a place called "Magic" something that gives student rates of 150/hr. I have seen crap work come from there, whites are a pinkish hue, colors are all off. terrible. BUT i have also seen good work come from there. There is one colorist in particular that one person I know swears by. Good rates and a good colorist. Then again, i, personally, wouldnt risk it. I'd pay the 75/hr more and go to CCI with someone i trust. Its up to you.
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#15 darrin p nim

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 02:24 AM

There are many places in LA that will do an HD transfer for less then 470/hr, many of them are pretty good also. A place called CCI will do it for 325/hr. I've done a dv transfer through them for 225/hr and they were very good. LaserPacific is also a great place to go, not sure on their rates though. in regards to the 175/hr. there is a place called "Magic" something that gives student rates of 150/hr. I have seen crap work come from there, whites are a pinkish hue, colors are all off. terrible. BUT i have also seen good work come from there. There is one colorist in particular that one person I know swears by. Good rates and a good colorist. Then again, i, personally, wouldnt risk it. I'd pay the 75/hr more and go to CCI with someone i trust. Its up to you.


The place is in Burbank, It's Magic Film & Video Works, ive seen good stuff and bad stuff come out of their myself. I think the colorist you refer to is Brian Leon, he's a good guy, i worked with him on a 16mm short i shot. Although i dont want to judge him off of that one experience but he was quick, he took direction well and seemed to know his stuff.
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