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What does it mean to render a file or sequence?


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#1 John Adolfi

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 07:53 PM

For some reason I'm having a time wrapping my mind around this definition. Help me out please.
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#2 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 08:13 PM

Rendering is just processing your data and turning it into a media file. Let's say you take a clip and color-correct it. When you are doing your color correction, you aren't altering the original file. When you've finished, you need to render it into a new file that now has your color corrections.

The thing to keep in mind is that all video editing and compositing programs just read from your original footage. When you use, say, Avid to edit your film, you are just making changes to a metadata file. "Take this part of clip A, and then this part of clip B, and then fade to this part of clip C." But those cuts don't exist outside of Avid. Your original media is just sitting there, untouched. When you are finished and ready to show someone your cut, you render your timeline, which creates a brand new media file containing all the changes you made.

Make sense?
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#3 timHealy

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 08:56 PM

The thing to keep in mind is that all video editing and compositing programs just read from your original footage. When you use, say, Avid to edit your film, you are just making changes to a metadata file. "Take this part of clip A, and then this part of clip B, and then fade to this part of clip C." But those cuts don't exist outside of Avid. Your original media is just sitting there, untouched. When you are finished and ready to show someone your cut, you render your timeline, which creates a brand new media file containing all the changes you made.


Some call digital editing "non destructive editing" as opposed to say editing with a film workprint.

best

Tim
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#4 Michael Collier

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 10:51 PM

Its also important to understand that when rendering you must tell the computer what sort of media to render to. Usually you keep the same file settings to render, but you can also render into various formats (MPEG, Uncompressed, highly compressed. H.264 etc) this helps if you need to change the file size for transport or distrabution. Also useful for upressing and downressing.

This opens up a lot of ideas you have to understand. Interlacing cadence, progressive mode, compression, colorspace etc.
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#5 John Adolfi

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 06:43 AM

Its also important to understand that when rendering you must tell the computer what sort of media to render to. Usually you keep the same file settings to render, but you can also render into various formats (MPEG, Uncompressed, highly compressed. H.264 etc) this helps if you need to change the file size for transport or distrabution. Also useful for upressing and downressing.

This opens up a lot of ideas you have to understand. Interlacing cadence, progressive mode, compression, colorspace etc.



Yes thank you I believe I'm getting it. As to learning all the rest you mentioned I'm reading a book on it for the 3rd time as we speak. I'm 45 and have been a super 8 nut for years and the learning curve is good sized in the digital arena for me.
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 09:14 AM

Hi,

In general computing terms, "render" generally refers to a process, potentially a lengthy process, by which the computer executes instructions you've made previously. The term originates in 3D graphics, whereby you set up a scene using low-resolution or wire-frame preview models, then hit "render" and it goes off and draws the final image. It also applies to video editing, where you might have DVE moves or other video graphics effects such as a chromakey which take more work than can be done in real time. "Rendering" usually implies that you end up with a file representing the finished work, so if you have a bunch of quicktime movies, AVI files or DPX sequences representing your camera-original material, you'll probably end up with another one representing the finished edit.

Phil
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