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Still Camera - Using 35mm Motion Picture Film


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#1 Matt Workman

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 11:12 AM

Hi,

I've heard about 3rd party companies taking short ends and turning them into 35mm still rolls. Where can I purchase these rolls?

If I shoot with a Nikon F-5, what is the aspect ratio?
Where is a good place to get them processed?
Is the processing similar to motion picture processing? I would probably just scan them after that.
How does the f-stop of the lens compare to the t-stop of a motion picture camera?

You would probably shoot at ISO of the film, 1/48 shutter, and only change the f-stop.

Does anyone have experience with this, it sounds like a good way to practice, inexpensivly. I would love to see some stills online if you have them.

Thanks. :D

Matt
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#2 Daniel Smith

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 01:42 PM

Hi,

I've heard about 3rd party companies taking short ends and turning them into 35mm still rolls. Where can I purchase these rolls?

If I shoot with a Nikon F-5, what is the aspect ratio?
Where is a good place to get them processed?
Is the processing similar to motion picture processing? I would probably just scan them after that.
How does the f-stop of the lens compare to the t-stop of a motion picture camera?

You would probably shoot at ISO of the film, 1/48 shutter, and only change the f-stop.

Does anyone have experience with this, it sounds like a good way to practice, inexpensivly. I would love to see some stills online if you have them.

Thanks. :D

Matt

The one thing I'd say is that when motion picture films are shot on 35mm film, they shoot them vertically at usually either 3 or 4 perf. With stills cameras, the film is shot horizontally. So it would probably work out at something like 8 perf. (Don't quote me on that)

That alters the depth of field and the end result focal length. So, no, practicing with a 35mm stills camera isn't exactly the same as with a 35mm cine camera. But, it's better than nothing.
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#3 Thomas Worth

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 01:46 PM

With stills cameras, the film is shot horizontally. So it would probably work out at something like 8 perf. (Don't quote me on that)

It is 8 perf, like VistaVision. The aspect ratio is 1.5:1.
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#4 Daniel Smith

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 01:48 PM

It is 8 perf, like VistaVision. The aspect ratio is 1.5:1.

Thanks! 18 and I'm losing my memory..
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#5 Jon Kukla

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 02:01 PM

Hi,

I've heard about 3rd party companies taking short ends and turning them into 35mm still rolls. Where can I purchase these rolls?

If I shoot with a Nikon F-5, what is the aspect ratio?
Where is a good place to get them processed?
Is the processing similar to motion picture processing? I would probably just scan them after that.
How does the f-stop of the lens compare to the t-stop of a motion picture camera?

You would probably shoot at ISO of the film, 1/48 shutter, and only change the f-stop.

Does anyone have experience with this, it sounds like a good way to practice, inexpensivly. I would love to see some stills online if you have them.

Thanks. :D

Matt


I don't know about specific parties, but if you have short ends of less than 100', you can easily use a bulk loader to "roll your own". As mentioned, the aspect ratio is 1.5:1. Where to get them processed? This is the real problem. No stills places really do it anymore, and the motion picture labs don't want to bother with short lengths in stills cartridges. So you might be out of luck there. Note that you should NOT under any circumstances attempt to send it in for development in a C41 lab - the ECN2 process is different and the remjet backing will likely screw up the C41 bath bigtime.

F-stops are the theoretical "ideal" apertures. However, since a certain amount of light is inevitably lost to the lens elements, the T-stop is what the equivalent aperture would be when taking into account the transmission factor of the lens. Basically, don't worry about it - just read your meter and dial in the number. And yeah, try to shoot at 1/50 or 1/60 shutter speed. I wouldn't worry about depth of field, because the ratio isn't identical either; however, the general goal is to play around with basic exposure and framing.

My personal opinion is just ditch the ECN2 stocks and go shoot stills with stills film. Sure, it won't be "the same", but neither will a single frame of an ECN2 stock - those stocks aren't designed to be viewed freeze-frame to begin with.

Good luck, in any case!
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