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the fire in saving private ryan


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#1 Oscar Godfrey

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 03:15 PM

Hello.
I was wondering what creates the effect of vertical streaks seen on shots of fire in saving private ryan. I am thinking specifically of the fires at the bunkers on the beach.
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#2 Matt Frank

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 03:24 PM

Hello.
I was wondering what creates the effect of vertical streaks seen on shots of fire in saving private ryan. I am thinking specifically of the fires at the bunkers on the beach.



My understanding is that this effect was created by cutting slits out of the shutter. I could be wrong though.
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#3 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 03:45 PM

Hello.
I was wondering what creates the effect of vertical streaks seen on shots of fire in saving private ryan. I am thinking specifically of the fires at the bunkers on the beach.


If I remember correctly, I think they took the protective coating off the lenses.
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 04:01 PM

Hello.
I was wondering what creates the effect of vertical streaks seen on shots of fire in saving private ryan. I am thinking specifically of the fires at the bunkers on the beach.


Hi,

Offsetting the shutter so as the film advances whilst the shutter is still open, causing the streaks. This has been discussed very recently. Easy to do with an Arri 435 Advanced.

Stephen
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#5 David Sweetman

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 04:27 PM

The effect was achieved with a mistimed shutter. Usually the film is locked in place the entire time the shutter is open. With a mistimed shutter, the film begins moving while the shutter is still open. They did this at the end of the shutter's cycle, so only the highlights streak because for some reason they aren't "set" yet but the rest of the image is.
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#6 Shane Bartlett

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 04:49 PM

In the American Cinematographer web archives there is an article about this. A similar effect was done in Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket, which is also mentioned.
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#7 isaac_klotz

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 05:57 PM

The effect was achieved with a mistimed shutter. Usually the film is locked in place the entire time the shutter is open. With a mistimed shutter, the film begins moving while the shutter is still open. They did this at the end of the shutter's cycle, so only the highlights streak because for some reason they aren't "set" yet but the rest of the image is.


well, the entire image is 'streaking' but it is the highlights which are actually noticeable. the midtones and shadows don't put out enough to make an impactful exposure on the moving negative.

-isaac klotz
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#8 Alex Haspel

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 04:05 AM

well, the entire image is 'streaking' but it is the highlights which are actually noticeable. the midtones and shadows don't put out enough to make an impactful exposure on the moving negative.

-isaac klotz


That means the offset time between shutter and film transport would have to be different when trying to achieve the same amount of streaking on different fast stocks, doesn't it?

Edited by Alex Haspel, 05 September 2006 - 04:06 AM.

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#9 Jon Kukla

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 04:57 PM

No, it should (largely) be a function of the mechanical offset - more offset means more exposure during the pulldown. What I think is being said is that it's an effect that will only be noticeable in the highlights. Your aperture and subject will be just as important as your film stock in determining which areas will be the most greatly affected.
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#10 Chris Keth

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 11:50 AM

Hi,

Offsetting the shutter so as the film advances whilst the shutter is still open, causing the streaks. This has been discussed very recently. Easy to do with an Arri 435 Advanced.

Stephen



Bingo. This is the right answer for what's going on. Cutting slits in the shutter would be like having that streak-effect, but only in dashed-line style.

There's a few shots in Zelig (shots of Woody sitting outside of the country cottage at a table) where the same thing happened.

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 06 September 2006 - 11:52 AM.

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