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Have I purchased the wrong filters?


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#1 Bjarne Eldhuset

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 01:04 PM

Hi, I feel kind of stupid for asking this, but here it goes:

Some days ago, I went to one of the most well respected fotography stores in Oslo. I spoke to a man in his fifties, who said he had shot lots of super 8 in his days.

I specified I was going to shoot a negative tungsten film outside, and therefore needed a filter that would balance the light so that it would not turn out blue-blue.

I had with me my nikon r10 and my nizo professional, and the elderly man behind the counter in my small town brought to me two Hoya 81A filters that he assured me would do the job.

Well, I get home, and read some confusing things, to me at least, on/in the filter packages.

On the back of the filter package, there is a scale, and the 81A filter is placed under "Cloudy, E.M. 1.4". This seemed ok to me, as it would suggest outdoorsy use.

But in the inside manual, it says the following about the 81A filter:
"Light balancing filter. Allows type B color films to be used with 3400 Kelvin photo lamps".

Will these filters be sufficient for my use? They weren't too cheap, so I sure hope so.

As I was planning to shoot some tests tomorrow, I'd be eternally gratefull! (hey, I'm a nice guy. I think. Most of the time. But take the Simpsons away from my telly, and I will haunt you...)

Bjarne, Oslo, Norway.
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#2 Jason Debus

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 01:20 PM

85B will give you full 5500K to 3200K conversion. The 81A is more amber than orange so the correction isn't as corse, I'm guessing your tests will turn out a little on the blue side.
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#3 Bjarne Eldhuset

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 01:29 PM

85B will give you full 5500K to 3200K conversion. The 81A is more amber than orange so the correction isn't as corse, I'm guessing your tests will turn out a little on the blue side.


Hi, thanks for your answer. I feel like asking "how much bluer do you think it will look", but I guess that is kind of hard to predict. Anyone have an idea?

I feel kind of misled by the man in the store, however, here I thought he was the good Jedi, but now that I think about it, there was something strange about his whiskey voice. Eerie.

Edited by Bjarne Eldhuset, 05 September 2006 - 01:30 PM.

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#4 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 01:30 PM

You were sold the incorrect filter. What you need is an 85 filter to be able to use tungsten film outdoors in daylight conditions. I'd see if I can return the 81a. Good shooting!
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#5 Ronney Ross

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 02:06 PM

I second trying to return the 81 if you can but know the 81A is a warming filter too. I shot some 64T with no problems with one and it actually give a more natural look since it isn't as warm.

-Ronney Ross
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#6 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 03:57 PM

An 85B is the actual correct filter but an 85 will work just as well. I had a camera shop guy trying to push some oddball filter on me once too... whats with those guys :blink:
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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 04:11 PM

Hi, I feel kind of stupid for asking this, but here it goes:

Some days ago, I went to one of the most well respected fotography stores in Oslo. I spoke to a man in his fifties, who said he had shot lots of super 8 in his days.

I specified I was going to shoot a negative tungsten film outside, and therefore needed a filter that would balance the light so that it would not turn out blue-blue.

I had with me my nikon r10 and my nizo professional, and the elderly man behind the counter in my small town brought to me two Hoya 81A filters that he assured me would do the job.

Well, I get home, and read some confusing things, to me at least, on/in the filter packages.

On the back of the filter package, there is a scale, and the 81A filter is placed under "Cloudy, E.M. 1.4". This seemed ok to me, as it would suggest outdoorsy use.

But in the inside manual, it says the following about the 81A filter:
"Light balancing filter. Allows type B color films to be used with 3400 Kelvin photo lamps".

Will these filters be sufficient for my use? They weren't too cheap, so I sure hope so.

As I was planning to shoot some tests tomorrow, I'd be eternally gratefull! (hey, I'm a nice guy. I think. Most of the time. But take the Simpsons away from my telly, and I will haunt you...)

Bjarne, Oslo, Norway.


Maybe you brought this up in a previous topic that I don't recall but don't your cameras have built in 85 filters?

Did the salesperson have an 85 filter available and still chose to sell you an 81A or was he just selling the best available filter? That doesn't necessarily mean much but it's still worth noting what motivated the salesperson to sell you that filter.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 07:35 PM

A filter that corrects Type B film (3200K) for 3400K lighting would be a very pale orange (the 81A filter).

A filter the corrects Type B film (3200K) for 5500K daylight would be a strong orange (the 85B filter.)
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Willys Widgets

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Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

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