Jump to content


Photo

The New World 65mm Shots


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Joe Taylor

Joe Taylor
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 397 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 September 2006 - 06:56 PM

Does anybody know specifically what shot were filmed in 65mm for "The New World?"
  • 0

#2 Dan Goulder

Dan Goulder
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1259 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 05 September 2006 - 07:49 PM

Does anybody know specifically what shot were filmed in 65mm for "The New World?"

The shots of the boats sailing into the harbor were filmed in 65mm.
  • 0

#3 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 05 September 2006 - 08:48 PM

The shots of the boats sailing into the harbor were filmed in 65mm.



That's all? That seems like a waste of money.
  • 0

#4 Jon-Hebert Barto

Jon-Hebert Barto
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 349 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 September 2006 - 03:06 PM

A lot of the "nature" shots, with available light.

Max knows much about this, I think. I know he likes Malick very much. Maybe he can be of some help...
  • 0

#5 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 September 2006 - 04:24 PM

A selection of what they termed "hyperreal" shots, often with the intention of accentuating an epiphany or unspoken moment, were shot in 65mm.
  • 0

#6 Ignacio Aguilar

Ignacio Aguilar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Madrid, Spain

Posted 06 September 2006 - 04:48 PM

I haven't seen a direct quote from anybody involved in the production regarding which scenes/specific shots used the 65mm format and I believe that I've read every technical article on this film. I may be wrong, but I think Lubezki just talked about "enhanced" moments between Smith and Pocahontas on the AC article, or something like that. Nothing about the ships or other sequences.

Anyway, I saw the film twice at the theater and I couldn't discern any large-format shot. It was very, very sharp, but nothing looked like real 65mm footage.
  • 0

#7 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 September 2006 - 05:25 PM

Anyway, I saw the film twice at the theater and I couldn't discern any large-format shot. It was very, very sharp, but nothing looked like real 65mm footage.

Same here. I worked with the script suerpvisor for the English scenes some months ago but forgot to ask her about the 65mm.
  • 0

#8 Jon-Hebert Barto

Jon-Hebert Barto
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 349 posts
  • Other

Posted 06 September 2006 - 06:16 PM

I just had to post this:

http://www.in70mm.co...6/new/world.htm

I was looking for info on which scenes were shot in 65mm and came across this on in70mm.com.
Funny stuff...
  • 0

#9 Dan Goulder

Dan Goulder
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1259 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 06 September 2006 - 06:45 PM

I haven't seen a direct quote from anybody involved in the production regarding which scenes/specific shots used the 65mm format and I believe that I've read every technical article on this film. I may be wrong, but I think Lubezki just talked about "enhanced" moments between Smith and Pocahontas on the AC article, or something like that. Nothing about the ships or other sequences.

Anyway, I saw the film twice at the theater and I couldn't discern any large-format shot. It was very, very sharp, but nothing looked like real 65mm footage.

My source is the post house that actually worked on those sequences.
  • 0

#10 John Holland

John Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2248 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London England

Posted 08 September 2006 - 11:23 AM

I think ,they were going to shoot whole film in 65mm , then changed their minds , dont think anything was shot in 65mm, stuck with Anamorphic . John Holland.
  • 0

#11 Jon Kukla

Jon Kukla
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Other

Posted 08 September 2006 - 03:21 PM

The AC article confirms that a very small percentage of the film was shot on 65mm, although you are right that Lubezki originally was looking at using it for everything.
  • 0

#12 Mariano Nante

Mariano Nante
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 109 posts
  • Other

Posted 14 September 2006 - 08:10 PM

Really? Can you use a steadycam or shoot handheld with a 65mm camera? I thought those weighed too much to be carried around just like that... (Malick and Lubezki agreed not to use tripods or cranes)
  • 0

#13 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 September 2006 - 02:27 AM

Panavision have a lightweight 65mm camera which can be used for steadicam and handheld. As far as I know it is an MOS camera though.
  • 0

#14 John Holland

John Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2248 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London England

Posted 15 September 2006 - 03:16 AM

Yes its, MOS , has a 500 ft mag , Kubrick used it a lot on 2001. John Holland.
  • 0

#15 Leo Anthony Vale

Leo Anthony Vale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2010 posts
  • Other
  • Pittsburgh PA

Posted 15 September 2006 - 12:43 PM

Yes its, MOS , has a 500 ft mag , Kubrick used it a lot on 2001. John Holland.


Also used extesively on a steadicam or panaglide in 'Brainstorm'.
Frequently with a 19mm Kowa 6x6 fisheye.
  • 0

#16 John Holland

John Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2248 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London England

Posted 15 September 2006 - 12:50 PM

And strapped to lots of racing cars in "Grand Prix" . John Holland.
  • 0

#17 Larry Fong

Larry Fong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 September 2006 - 11:51 AM

...and Greg Lundsgaard did 65mm Steadicam on "Far and Away"...
  • 0

#18 Leo Anthony Vale

Leo Anthony Vale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2010 posts
  • Other
  • Pittsburgh PA

Posted 25 September 2006 - 01:25 PM

And strapped to lots of racing cars in "Grand Prix" . John Holland.


The old Making of... short has a couple of shots of them being hand held. They look so compact.
I tried one on once, a bit on the heavy side but not as awkward as an NPR.

Can you find the reflection of S.Kubrick using one in '2001'?

Apparently all the dialogue in 'The New World' was post-synced because Malick was giving directions during takes.
  • 0

#19 John Holland

John Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2248 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London England

Posted 25 September 2006 - 02:47 PM

Leo .so long since i saw 2001 on a Cinerama screen , about 10 times over a month , do remember reflection , but cant recall shot , please put me out of my misery . John Holland ,London.
  • 0

#20 Dan Goulder

Dan Goulder
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1259 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 25 September 2006 - 02:58 PM

And strapped to lots of racing cars in "Grand Prix" . John Holland.

Trivia of the day: George Lucas was a camera op on "Grand Prix".
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Opal

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc