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Camera Reports: Lens & T-Stop info


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#1 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 04:51 PM

Hey Everyone,
I had a question about filling out camera reports. I've seen now a few places which dont have columns for lens and T-/F- stop. Just went to Technicolor, and also Cinefilm reports dont seem to do this. Are these columns not important? or is it really just the DP's/operator's/1st AC's/production office's/lab's call? How many of you actually fill out the whole thing, and how often do you just put in the "most important" info (like scene, take, footage, etc., etc.)?

:)

Edited by Daniel Wallens, 06 September 2006 - 04:52 PM.

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#2 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 05:05 PM

Always always always report lens and stop. If there are no spaces for this on the report, then use one of the comments lines. In fact, you can skip a space between each scene and write this in the comments box of the skipped space since the lens/stop is generally stays the same for the entire scene, not counting outdoor ambient light adjustments etc... Just make sure it is clear that the info is for the scene following on the report and not the one preceding it.

One of the challenges of camera reports is keeping a ton of information well-organized and easy to read, which can be a real hassle if you normally have bad handwriting (like me!). Find a way to get everything you need on there and just make sure the people who have to deal with your notes can make sense of it.
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#3 Max Jacoby

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 05:37 PM

I second that. especially the lens is very important. If there is a problem with one lens, you'll be able to retrace it immediately. Which is why it is a good idea to always take a copy of the report to the rushes screening where any problems become first visible. Provided they are on film of course...
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 05:47 PM

Always always always report lens and stop. If there are no spaces for this on the report, then use one of the comments lines. In fact, you can skip a space between each scene and write this in the comments box of the skipped space since the lens/stop is generally stays the same for the entire scene, not counting outdoor ambient light adjustments etc... Just make sure it is clear that the info is for the scene following on the report and not the one preceding it.

One of the challenges of camera reports is keeping a ton of information well-organized and easy to read, which can be a real hassle if you normally have bad handwriting (like me!). Find a way to get everything you need on there and just make sure the people who have to deal with your notes can make sense of it.


I always take note of those things, but not on the camera report. The lab doesn't need to know any of that stuff and it just makes your reports overly dense with information and possibly messy. I just do it in a seperate little notebook that I can take a bit more space to note lens info, height, et cetera.
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#5 Matt Workman

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 06:12 PM

After trying to work with the normal Technicolor camera reports I pretty much gave up. It was very hard to cram filters, lens, f-stop etc. neatly.

I started keeping a seperate notebook on the day and then transfered as neatly as a could and concisely back onto the official reports to then distribute amongst the departments.

I see AC's with metal/alum cases to keep their reports/notes in. Its a pain to carry though. :ph34r:
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#6 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 06:20 PM

That's really smart actually, as I usually end up recopying my reports at the end of the day anyway (to clear up any typos, scratched out remarks, etc).
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#7 David E Elkins

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 03:42 PM

Check out the web site for my book The Camera Assistant's Manual.

http://www.cameraassistantmanual.com

have a couple of different styles of generic camera reports with columns for lens and stop.

Let me know what you think. Thanks.
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#8 Jon Kukla

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 06:12 PM

One of the things to consider is that different labs and regions may have different report sheet standards. I've never worked in the US, but reading Doug Hart's book, it sounds like some report sheets are smaller than a standard piece of paper. Here in the UK the reports are always a full page, with full lines for each slate/take. That's obviously going to be much easier to keep the info on.

The other thing to consider is what you're shooting. It's not uncommon to write little beyond "lens var, T var" on a music video shoot report sheet, and just cram as many rolls onto a page as possible. Feature films, obviously, will be much more detailed.

I've found that having a tin is very useful because it not only can keep everything together (ruler, older sheets, can labels) and hold the sheets down, but it also is good protection for the sheets in the event of snow, rain, wind, etc. Usually just stash it in the back or front pocket of a camera bag.

My other rule is to always write down the info as it's happening in a little notebook, and only transcribe that info to the report sheet AFTER the roll is dead. Just avoids little problems if you try to anticipate too much...
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#9 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 09:14 PM

Hi all,

Thanks for all the helpful replies. David, I have actually read your book and love it! (I emailed you about it in fact, about the labels). Thanks for your fine resource. Unfortunately since then, I've lost it! Still a great book and website though.

Muchas gracias!
:)
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Glidecam

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Aerial Filmworks

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Opal

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Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Tai Audio