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getting a feature off the ground


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#1 rob spence

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 05:23 AM

Hi all,
I'm trying to get a british feature off the ground...anyone interested my website is www.bigness.co.uk

any comments ( or cash! ) gratefully recieved.
Cheers
Rob Spence
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 02:15 PM

Hi,

> I'm trying to get a british feature off the ground

That's a bit silly, isn't it?

Phil
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#3 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 03:09 PM

Pay no mind, he is an incurable cynic.

If you provide more details about your production, people here will be more willing to give advice, etc.

Otherwise, good luck!
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#4 rob spence

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 04:01 PM

Hi
The details are on the website

www.bigness.co.uk

please serious replies only

Cheers

Rob Spence
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 06:29 PM

Hi,

First I'd like to know how on earth you managed to get any funding out of anyone - well done! Usually it's like squeezing blood from a stone round here.

What format are you considering shooting, and when is shooting liable to take place?

What postproduction and distribution goals do you have?

Phil
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#6 rob spence

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 10:25 AM

Hi Phil,
Script funding was via Northern Film and Media which is our regional UK Film Council board...I believe it's very difficult getting similar funding if you're in London because there are so many more boxes of criteria to tick...as you say blood from a stone. However NFM have no feature development cash like they have in the rest of the country...so you can essentially develop a script but not a film...I don't know why. So it's onto the funding mill...we're trying for more private funding now because I'd rather do a cheaper production than jump through too many of other peoples hoops and keep artistic integrity if possible.
A film that went down the same route locally to us was Dog Soldiers, a horror movie, and went on to gross alot of money world wide...so it is possible to make money on low budgets ( sometimes!).
We're shooting on super 16 as we own all the gear ...plus the feel is very apt for this subject matter...post is going to be down to what budget we have at the latter stages...we have avid express dv which is good for offline...and conform to a higher spec for TV copies, these will be used to sell the project to the next stage.
If it goes to festival or theatre release then I see an HD transfer to 35mm ( unless HD projection hasn't taken a hold before we finish ! ). We have run the project past a couple of distibutors who think the project is a great idea...which is good for our market research at least.

Cheers
Rob Spence
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#7 Richard Boddington

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 11:47 PM

Hi Phil,

A film that went down the same route locally to us was Dog Soldiers, a horror movie, and went on to gross alot of money world wide...so it is possible to make money on low budgets ( sometimes!).


You hit the nail on the head there, HORROR movie, it's about the only genre you can do super cheap and stand a decent chance of a return. Even horror movies that are so bad they're good, make money. People get together and watch 4-5 of them in a row and laugh their butts off.

But hey the makers don't care, they made some cash.

In any event, good luck with your vision you'll get it made with persistance. I start my indie feature in three weeks. Phil Rhodes will be the first person to get a copy of it. I figure if he has even one positive comment to make about it then I know I have a blockbuster on my hands :D

R,
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#8 rob spence

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 10:21 AM

Thanks for the good luck Richard...any web info on your feature?

Cheers
Rob Spence
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#9 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 11:36 AM

No web info as of yet. I decided not to put the cart before the horse.

In a few months there should be though if I survive the process.

R,
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#10 Sean Azze

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 04:40 PM

Your lead looks like a young Malcolm Mcdowell.

Looks interesting, Good luck!
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#11 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 10:22 PM

Your lead looks like a young Malcolm Mcdowell.

Looks interesting, Good luck!


I was thinking the EXACT same thing.

R,
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#12 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:31 AM

Well, you need a better poster. That one didn't really make me want to see the movie and that's the whole point of the poster. I had a low budget distributor tell me once, the most important element in selling a low budget film is not plot or story or even how good the film is but the poster and box cover art. That's what people see when they go to pick up a movie they haven't heard of before. with out stars or a heavy advertising budget, It's really all ya got. Your description could be stronger and should probably go through a rewrite or two to get in to really peak the reader's interest. The basic plot sounds interesting but I think you could do a lot more to draw the potential audiance in with it. If you want to attract investors and more well known actors you also want to create as much buzz as possible about your project and promotional material can help do that. Remember, as crass as it may sound, your trying to sell your film to people. That doesn't mean you have to come off like a carnival barker, but it does mean every element of your presentation should be designed to get people to want to see your film or if your in pre-production, make your film. Decide what your film is, that will tell you who your audiance will be. If it's a comedy, then make people believe it's the funniest thing sence Young Frankinstien. Promotional material is no place for subtlety, taste, style yes but not subltelty. Remember the big word in show business is business. B)
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#13 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 08:13 AM

Hi,

> you also want to create as much buzz as possible

Oh, what, really? Well, I never. Stop the presses!

Phil
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#14 Tim Partridge

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 09:35 AM

Hi all,
I'm trying to get a british feature off the ground...


A film that went down the same route locally to us was Dog Soldiers, a horror movie, and went on to gross alot of money world wide...so it is possible to make money on low budgets ( sometimes!).


Hold on-

DOG SOLDIERS wasn't even made in Britain with British money. :huh:
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#15 Hal Smith

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 11:07 AM

Well, you need a better poster. That one didn't really make me want to see the movie and that's the whole point of the poster.

Ah Cap'n, you can be so cruel, and right on the money! The best way to be successful in anything is to look like you're already a big success in all the details. I have a habit of putting on a suit anytime I'm trying to cajole something out of someone. I walked out of an NAB a few years ago with an $1800 free sample - thank you Jones New York.
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#16 Jesus Sifuentes

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 11:18 AM

when I first tried to get funding via the internet, I used a paypal donation button. it didnt work for me so I took it off my official site but it might work for you since you have more press.

http://www.paypal.co...e-intro-outside
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#17 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 12:29 AM

Hi,

> you also want to create as much buzz as possible

Oh, what, really? Well, I never. Stop the presses!

Phil


Phil, if your gonna be a smart ass at least TRY and be a little more creative about it. I mean come on, is that the absolute BEST you can do? I almost feel embarrassed for you. Why don't you take another shot at it. I'm sure a smart guy like you can come up with SOMETHING better than this tripe. B)
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#18 rob spence

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 11:37 AM

Hi Tim Partridge,
Just to clarify things...Neill Marshall...writer, director and editor of Dog Soldiers and his producer Keith Bell aka Northmen Productions live and work from the North East of England, they gained private funding which was matched by grants from Luxembourg which is why it was mostly shot there ( posing as Scotland). The film was successfully sold which led to the funding of their next film...The Descent.
All very impressive in my book.
Cheers
Rob Spence
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#19 rob spence

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 03:22 AM

Hi Jesus,
Thats a great idea using paypal for 'donations' to the production, we'll be adding that soon.
I checked out your website...how's progress...did you get fubding at all?
Best of luck

Rob Spence
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