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Recommend me some films


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#1 Daniel Smith

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 07:07 AM

Hi.

I'm slowly starting to pick up my interest in film again, except for this time I'm taking it on with the right attitude, and know how.

So, I need to start watching some *good* films. What can you guys recommend? I imagine a lot of stuff on the lines of Stanley Kubrick?

If you could write down some suggestions and I'll get watching.

Cheers.
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#2 Dominik Muench

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 07:56 AM

recommending films is like recommending a good restaurant...all a matter of taste, but if it helps i'll tell you some of my favs :)

- Rain Man
- House Of D
- City Of God
- The Weatherman
- The Exorcist
- The Thin Red Line
- Big Fish
- Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
- Brotherhood of the Wolves
- The Last Emperor


and maaany more :)

i think its always a good idea to look outside the group of the "usual suspects" as well. kubrick, kurosawa and Co. werent the only good filmmakers...check out less know directors and movies as well. And most importantly....check out foreign movies as well...americans are not the only ones making movies. check out european, indian, asian productions and so on.
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#3 Daniel Smith

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 08:23 AM

recommending films is like recommending a good restaurant...all a matter of taste, but if it helps i'll tell you some of my favs :)

- Rain Man
- House Of D
- City Of God
- The Weatherman
- The Exorcist
- The Thin Red Line
- Big Fish
- Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
- Brotherhood of the Wolves
- The Last Emperor
and maaany more :)

i think its always a good idea to look outside the group of the "usual suspects" as well. kubrick, kurosawa and Co. werent the only good filmmakers...check out less know directors and movies as well. And most importantly....check out foreign movies as well...americans are not the only ones making movies. check out european, indian, asian productions and so on.

Ok cool thanks. I'm actually going to copy the films you mentioned down onto a checklist. I'm more or less forcing myself to watch more and more films, but it's not asthough I'm not enjoying them.

(I can't actually think of any films I don't like, I tend to like everything I watch. Maybe that's a sign of narrow taste I'm not sure.)

Anyway, thanks Dominik. B)

Edited by Daniel Ashley-Smith, 07 September 2006 - 08:24 AM.

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#4 Wendell_Greene

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 08:30 AM

Here's a repost of a list of films by David Mullen that he felt every film student should see. It' will give you a good start, since all are available on DVD. [* = films I've added ] I'd advise that whenever possible try to see these films projected, it will increase your appreciation for cinema. All the best!


B&W:

Sunrise
Citizen Kane
Night of the Hunter
Out of the Past
Battle of Algiers
The Man Who Wasn't There
Dr. Strangelove
The Elephant Man*

COLOR:

Black Narcissus
Lawrence of Arabia
2001
The Godfather, Part 2
"Apocalypse Now"
"The Conformist" [not on DVD, but try and see a print]
The French Connection
Days of Heaven
Blade Runner
JFK (for mixing of formats)
Snow Falling on Cedars or Sleepy Hollow (monochromatic design)
The Constant Gardener or City of God (mix of Super-16 and 35mm is interesting)
Collateral or The Celebration (development of a digital aesthetic)
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#5 James McBee

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 11:08 AM

The following are films I consider required viewing (Most of them are pretty obvious, but a few of them are not):

Naked
Vera Drake
Metropolis
M
Rear Window
Vertigo
Strangers on a Train
Badlands
Ararat
Dead Man Walking
The Third Man
The Grand Illusion
The Beat that My Heart Skipped
The 400 Blows
Gandhi
Chinatown

Some notable ?indie? films from the last few years?some of which may be imperfect?but all of which are definitely worth checking out include:

In This World
The War Within
The Ballad of Jack and Rose
The Believer


There are too many great films to ever compile an even remotely adequate list. And of course it all comes down to personal taste. Anyway, this is just what popped into my head right now.
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#6 John Holland

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 11:21 AM

Apart from most of already mentioned , most of Sergio Leone , West Side Story , just the wonderful Super Panavision 70 images , 25asa , night scenes look better than most you see now . The Hill. Sydney Lumet , director , Ossie Morris , cinematography , very rough B+W , suits the story so well very powerful film and Sean Connerys best ever performance . Will carry on thinking !! . John Holland .
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#7 Dan Goulder

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 11:39 AM

For studying the creative potential of wide angle lenses, as well as dynamic camera work, you may want to check out "Raising Arizona", and "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas".
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#8 Patrick McGowan

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 12:43 PM

I got a netflix account for three months and then cancelled it (I ran out of money). Here are the movies that really stuck with me:

A Woman is a Woman (shows what I think are anamorphic lens flares?) Correct me if I'm wrong.
Alphaville
Boy's Don't Cry
Battle Royale
Happy Together
The 400 Blows
(I rented over 50 movies, but I can't remember them.)

My favorites: (which I'm sure you have all seen, but if you haven't, you really should)
City of God
Annie Hall
Five Easy Pieces
The first Star Wars film: A New Hope and then maybe Empire Strikes back. Maybe parts of Return of the Jedi but that's it. fu** the rest of them.
Elephant

I love making fu**ing movie lists. I'm sorry.
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#9 Jesus Sifuentes

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 12:49 PM

some of my personal favs.

Titus - Directed by Julie Taymor
Amores Perros
Oldboy
Se7en
Ghost Dog
Pi
Munich
3 colors: Red, White, Blue -Directed by Krzysztof Kieslowski
Clockwork Orange
28 Days Later

Edited by elgatonegro, 07 September 2006 - 12:50 PM.

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#10 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 12:56 PM

How about Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch". Antonioni's "Blowup". David Lynch's "Blue Velvet". Orson Welles "Touch of Evil". Can't believe Mullens left that off his b&w list.

For subtle, smart comedy and a highly stylized look check out Wes Anderson's "Rushmore".

Happy Viewing!
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#11 Jon-Hebert Barto

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 01:15 PM

W. Greene had a fantastic list and "why"/"what" to go with it. Everyone here has a fantastic list....

I am also in favor of viewing films that are in diametric opposition regarding film theory. I guess this is more of a directors thing...But, no, because it has to do with grammar.

Watch:

Tarkovsky/Eisenstein (Tarkovsky wholely rejected "montage")
F.Lang/Goddard (Goddard loved Langs films and considered him a master, but his style is opposite)

If you're not into that, my general pics would be "Andrei Rublev" and "The Woman in the Dunes"...Also "Le Corbeau" and "Wages of Fear"...there are so many! (These films are all B&W, however...)

Of course the American New Wave of seventies cinema is a film school unto itself...so much, so much..

Forgot! RAGING BULL!!! MIND BLOWING!!!

Edited by Jon-Hebert Barto, 07 September 2006 - 01:17 PM.

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#12 Thomas Worth

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 01:35 PM

Hey guys. A lot of what you've suggested is on my favorites list, too. I thought instead of adding, I would give a quick commentary on a few of the movies that really influenced me visually:

City of God - I was blown away when I discovered it was shot on film and then telecine'd to HDCAM, which was then graded digitally and filmed out. I always use this film as the example of the "poor man's D.I." It's one of the most beautiful movies I've seen. And I saw it projected.

Le Pacte des loups (Brotherhood of the Wolf) - Another gorgeous film. There's a fight scene near the beginning that has some of the best editing I've seen. I think the entire scene (covered from about a zillion angles) was shot 50fps, then speed ramped in post. What gives it away is the high speed shutter effect -- not intentional, but simply a result of running the cameras at a high frame rate and then removing frames to get back to 25fps (25 because it's French).

28 Days Later - This is my all time favorite example of a DV movie done correctly. Shot using the Canon XL1 (PAL).

The Thin Red Line - Okay, this is a really long movie, and somewhat boring at parts. However, the look is absolutely stunning. The "magic hour" stuff is really, really beautiful. I like to use this movie as an example of good cinematography because I don't think anyone but Terry Malick is insane enough (or has enough financial support) to go to the great lengths he does to achieve such amazing results.

All for now. This is getting long. ;)
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#13 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 01:45 PM

Hi,

I am disturbed by the overwhelming number of films on these lists I have not seen.

In fact it's easier to go and look for the ones I have seen.

Phil
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#14 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 03:07 PM

Lawrence of Arabia
The Shining
Apacolypes Now
The Godfather
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Jaws
Titanic
Aliens
2001
Ben Hur
Young Frankinstien
Dracula
Dr. Strangelove
The Searchers
Saving Private Ryan
The Great Escape
The Temionator
Predator
Platoon
The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
the Exorsist
The Maltese Falcon
Casablanca
Psycho
Vetigo
La Strata
Rebel without a Cause
American Graffetti
Star Wars
Alien
Giant
The Wizard of Oz
Gone with the Wind
White Heat
Frankenstien
The African Queen
Modern Times
A Place in the Sun
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Patton
The Seventh Seal
The Seven Samuri
The 10 Commandments
The Thing
Faces
Annie Hall
MASH
Goodfellows
True Grit
Dirty Harry
The Sixth Sense
Grease
Oklahoma
Terms Of Endearment
E.T.
Wild at Heart
Pulp Fiction
Enter the Dragon
The Breakfast Club
The Adventures of Robin Hood
Deliverance
Cool Hand Luke
The Posiden Adventure
Jason and The Argonauts
Touch of Evil

In my opinion this is a list of what I consider to be perfect movies. These are the standards by which one should gage their own work and from which one should learn how films should be make. B)
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#15 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 03:22 PM

You really consider Predator a perfect movie? ;-) Really funny, I'll give you that, but perfect? One of the all-time greats to turn the sound down on and make up dialogue with friends. Maybe you're right.
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#16 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 03:29 PM

Many of my favourite films have been mentioned hear already, but here are some that haven't, new and old.

The Devils Backbone (Del Torro)
Day for Night (Truffaut)
Shadow of a Doubt (Hitchcock)
The Man in the White Suit (Mackendrick)
The Best of Youth parts 1 & 2 (warning its 6 hours long)
Ohio (Ozu)
Plein de Soliel (Clement)
The Narrow Margin (Fliecher)
Journey to Italy (Rosselini)
The Innocents (Clayton)
Don't Look Now (Roeg)
Rocco and His Brothers
Trainspotting (Boyle)

Edited by Andy_Alderslade, 07 September 2006 - 03:33 PM.

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#17 Jonathan Benny

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 03:29 PM

Antonioni's "Blowup".


Definitely a must see. This one is on my "top 5".

Beyond just being a brilliantly directed film, it really is a study in both camerawork and editing. And of course, minimalist dialogue.

AJB
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#18 Jon-Hebert Barto

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 09:57 PM

BLOW-UP for sure...It is also one of the only films I know of that uses its action as metaphor, not just its lighting. Briliant picture that many disregard as pretentious...


How about Coppolas " RUMBLE FISH ", talk about image as metaphor! He practically hits you over the head with it. I think Burum did this, he is a baddass mofo....His work with Depalma is also stand-out!!! Check him out pronto.
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#19 David Sweetman

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 11:55 PM

Some that haven't been mentioned:

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
12 Angry Men
Casablanca
The Thing (1982)
Magnolia
The Deer Hunter
Murder by Death (so it's not great cinema, give me a break, it's still awesome!)
Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal
Following

This thread makes me want to sign up with Netfilx...

(Oh, and Apocalypse Now was mentioned, make sure you get a hold of the original cut, not the redeux)
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#20 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 12:05 AM

You really consider Predator a perfect movie? ;-) Really funny, I'll give you that, but perfect? One of the all-time greats to turn the sound down on and make up dialogue with friends. Maybe you're right.


Yes, In the Action / Adventure genra it has stood the test of time, generated sequiels, been imitated and parodied and is know to virtually everyone. It is as exciting today as it was the day it came out. If one were planning to make an action / adventure film, I don't know of any film I could recommend more to show someone how it should be done. B)

Some that haven't been mentioned:

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
12 Angry Men
Casablanca
The Thing (1982)
Magnolia
The Deer Hunter
Murder by Death (so it's not great cinema, give me a break, it's still awesome!)
Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal
Following

This thread makes me want to sign up with Netfilx...

(Oh, and Apocalypse Now was mentioned, make sure you get a hold of the original cut, not the redeux)


I mentioned Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and Casablanca, that I can forgive, but Apocalypse Now, the original cut over REDUX????!!!!! BLASPHOMY!!!!!!
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