Jump to content


Photo

film rewinds / spool holders


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Oscar Godfrey

Oscar Godfrey
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 September 2006 - 04:34 PM

Hello,
I have got hold of two posts for holding reels of film. One of them has an arm that can be used to wind the reel, but the other one has a threaded end with a spring and a disc that screws onto it. It is quite difficult to describe, but i am hoping someone will know what i mean.
What i would like to know is how do i use them with a film viewer that i also have?
Thank you.
  • 0

#2 Dan Horstman

Dan Horstman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 94 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Washington, DC

Posted 07 September 2006 - 04:56 PM

Can you post some pictures? Or at least list the type of viewer?

If it is a Moviescop viewer it is pretty simple. You should probably attach the rewinds to a table (most have holes or slots on the base that allow you to use a bolt)

The rewinds should be about 3 to 4 feet apart. So that you can stand in the middle and easily reach each of the rewinds. The viewer goes in the middle.

Put your film (wound to heads out) on the left hand rewind (if you have your film on a core you will need a split reel) Thread the film through the rollers on the viewer and take up on the right hand rewind (you will need an empty reel or another split reel and core)

When you wind through the film you should use your hand on the feed reel to create a little bit of drag. Most rewinds have a knob that you can screw in to adjust tension...but in most of old rewinds I have used, this is usually missing or broken...so use your hand on the feed reel. Wind through the film at a fairly steady pace, avoid abrupt starting or stopping so you don't cause damage to the film.

And there you go.

If you have an old desk or table that you can use just for this, then you might want to cut out a hole in the table, mount a small light and put a peice of white plastic over the hole. This makes it easier to see the image on the film when you are marking it for a cut.
  • 0

#3 Oscar Godfrey

Oscar Godfrey
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 September 2006 - 05:54 PM

here is a picture of the one that i don't understand with the spring. DSC00013.JPG

Edited by Oscar Godfrey, 07 September 2006 - 05:54 PM.

  • 0

#4 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 07 September 2006 - 06:22 PM

here is a picture of the one that i don't understand with the spring. DSC00013.JPG

That's a feed side with a built-in clutch. Much better than using the little screw friction adjustment on the other kind of rewind. It will give you a much more even reel pack when winding film onto the other side. The only drawback is you'll have to reverse the reels to rewind.
  • 0

#5 Oscar Godfrey

Oscar Godfrey
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 September 2006 - 06:36 PM

so is it supposed to get tighter or looser as i wind the film onto the other reel?
  • 0

#6 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 07 September 2006 - 09:10 PM

so is it supposed to get tighter or looser as i wind the film onto the other reel?

Ideally the wrap is the same tension all the way through. The spring clutch on yours is about as good a constant speed tensioner you'll find short of very expensive motor driven setups. Round up a junk reel of film and practice. The best back tension will be at the point where the film doesn't droop too much as you're winding. You'll probably get the knack with some practice. One hint - never stop winding suddenly, always slow down gradually. I often reach over and use some pressure with my hand on the edge of the back reel when slowing down.
  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Opal

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

CineLab

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Opal