Jump to content


Photo

Old NASA style stock footage


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Michael Rizzi

Michael Rizzi
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 10 September 2006 - 03:35 PM

I have a short film coming up that takes place in the late 50's/early 60's. The director wants a look from that period and also be able to cut in stock footage of things like rockets taking off into space and other various science/sci-fi things. So I guess I have two questions...

1. I was planning on doing a lot of coloring in post (we're shooting super 16), but are there any suggestions as to what I can do in camera to get me as close to that look as possible. I'm thinking about a low contrast, high key, pastel type look. Stocks, filters?

2. Where would I find that specific NASA/space travel stock footage? Preferably cheap :D

Thanks,

Rizzi
  • 0

#2 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 10 September 2006 - 04:07 PM

I have a short film coming up that takes place in the late 50's/early 60's. The director wants a look from that period and also be able to cut in stock footage of things like rockets taking off into space and other various science/sci-fi things. So I guess I have two questions...

1. I was planning on doing a lot of coloring in post (we're shooting super 16), but are there any suggestions as to what I can do in camera to get me as close to that look as possible. I'm thinking about a low contrast, high key, pastel type look. Stocks, filters?

2. Where would I find that specific NASA/space travel stock footage? Preferably cheap :D

Thanks,

Rizzi



Hi,

Royalty free stock footage is probably the cheapest way to go.

http://www.timeimage...on-footage.html

Stephen
  • 0

#3 dr_gonzo

dr_gonzo
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 54 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • BROOKLYN USA

Posted 10 September 2006 - 04:19 PM

Hi,

Royalty free stock footage is probably the cheapest way to go.

http://www.timeimage...on-footage.html

Stephen



I remember a few years ago having a friend who needed footage of space shuttle launches. He ended up writing to NASA and they sent him a few tapes free of charge!!!!
  • 0

#4 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 10 September 2006 - 04:23 PM

I remember a few years ago having a friend who needed footage of space shuttle launches. He ended up writing to NASA and they sent him a few tapes free of charge!!!!


Hi,

I guess the US taxpayers already paid for the footage!

Stephen
  • 0

#5 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 10 September 2006 - 11:37 PM

You won't get the footage for free, NASA footage is handled by a private company. There will be dubbing charges and a search fee, they charge $75.00 per search. The footage it self is public domain like all US gov't footage.

Next step, you have to find the guy who sells it and does the searches.

R.
  • 0

#6 Jaan Shenberger

Jaan Shenberger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Director
  • San Francisco

Posted 11 September 2006 - 01:56 AM

http://artbeats.com/...php?pg=1&id=192
  • 0

#7 Brad Skiles

Brad Skiles
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Other

Posted 11 September 2006 - 02:26 AM

Search for footage:

http://nix.nasa.gov/
  • 0

#8 Rory Hanrahan

Rory Hanrahan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 175 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • NYC

Posted 11 September 2006 - 09:47 AM

You may want to check out the video for Boards of Canada's "Dayvan Cowboy", directed by Melissa Olsen (Google it). The bulk of the video is NASA stock footage of high-altitude parachute jumps filmed sometime during the late 50's-early 60's. It's an awe inspiring image, and may help you get an idea of what the stocks they were using at the time looked like.
  • 0

#9 Michael Rizzi

Michael Rizzi
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:08 PM

You may want to check out the video for Boards of Canada's "Dayvan Cowboy", directed by Melissa Olsen (Google it). The bulk of the video is NASA stock footage of high-altitude parachute jumps filmed sometime during the late 50's-early 60's. It's an awe inspiring image, and may help you get an idea of what the stocks they were using at the time looked like.



I checked out the video. That was pretty amazing...I had no idea they did test jumps from that altitude. Unfortunately because of the compression on youtube's videos it's a little difficult to judge film stocks and image quality. I'm thinking about maybe shooting with reversal stock. It's supposed to look like a NASA documentary, as if there was a cameraman along with these astronauts when they discovered another planet and the footage was found later. Any thoughts?
  • 0

#10 Dan Horstman

Dan Horstman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 94 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Washington, DC

Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:13 PM

You could also search the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for footage. Much of this is public domain stuff. You will have to pay to have the copies made, but that should be it.

www.archives.gov
  • 0


Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Opal

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Opal

CineLab

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport