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Another Proclamation that Film is Dead--UGH!


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 05:44 PM

Today, I endured two hours of a professor showing off his photo work, and all that stuff. Towards the end, he goes off on how much easier everything is with digital, and he proudly proclaimed that Kodak will stop making film in five years. I think film has a little more life than that!
Brian R.
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#2 dr_gonzo

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 05:56 PM

Today, I endured two hours of a professor showing off his photo work, and all that stuff. Towards the end, he goes off on how much easier everything is with digital, and he proudly proclaimed that Kodak will stop making film in five years. I think film has a little more life than that!
Brian R.


in TEN years perhaps their will be a 50/50 division of features shot on HD vs. film....but give your professor a good punch in the throat for me.
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#3 Brian Rose

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 06:51 PM

You should have heard him when I asked this:

"Isn't digital less disciplined? With film, you only get one shot to get it right, so naturally you plan it out, take you time, and make sure it is what you want. With digital, all you do is point and shoot, and at the end of the day, you can delete the stuff you don't like."

Man, he went off. Touched a raw nerve I expect!
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#4 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 06:57 PM

What an idiot...I want to come back in five years and ask what all those "film is dead" people what they think when film is still the origination medium on over 50% of all narrative productions.
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#5 Daniel Stigler

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 06:57 PM

You should have heard him when I asked this:

"Isn't digital less disciplined? With film, you only get one shot to get it right, so naturally you plan it out, take you time, and make sure it is what you want. With digital, all you do is point and shoot, and at the end of the day, you can delete the stuff you don't like."

Man, he went off. Touched a raw nerve I expect!


I experienced that kind of shooting. It gives you 99 crappy takes to choose from...
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#6 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 06:58 PM

I experienced that kind of shooting. It gives you 99 crappy takes to choose from...


Yeah, I been there too...
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#7 David Sweetman

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 07:29 PM

Well technically, I think film and digital are equally dead. I don't think there are any living elements in either format.

Anyway the use of still-film will certainly dwindle (and has) before the use of motion picture film dwindles. Of course most professional photographers still have a deep love and respect for film. I think you may be hard-pressed to find one with a harsh word to say about film. I'm just glad I was born before the transition; all the pictures of my youth have amazing resolution and lattitude, with beautiful colors and sometimes a nice faded look. Worlds better than any consumer digital cameras could render.
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#8 Brian Rose

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 08:05 PM

I should say, I don't hate digital. It has its uses, and when used correctly, has its own strengths apart from film. What burned me was the level of haughtiness this prof. had toward digital over film. And it seemed for all the wrong reasons. He kept talking about how much easier it is to make prints and maniuplate images than it used to be. He admitted the quality wasn't as good as earlier techinques, but he was just so thrilled that instead of having to labor in a darkroom, he could do everything on computer at his home, and then print it out. To me, this seemed to be the completely wrong idea. I like what is hard! Sure, its a b*tch to take light readings, shoot the film, get it processed and all that just for a few minutes of footage, but IMHO, the product of all that labor, seeing that actual, beautiful image on that thin strip of film is so much more satisfying than a digital image that can be taped over in a second, as though it never existed. For me, art is about labor, and I was so troubled that this particular prof didn't see that.
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#9 Chayse Irvin

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 09:00 PM

Today, I endured two hours of a professor showing off his photo work, and all that stuff. Towards the end, he goes off on how much easier everything is with digital, and he proudly proclaimed that Kodak will stop making film in five years. I think film has a little more life than that!
Brian R.


Heh. I remember hearing that same thing 5 years ago. Needless to say he was wrong.
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#10 Michael Collier

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Posted 11 September 2006 - 11:55 PM

huh. And hes a prof you say? Seems odd he wouldn't be working in the feild, what with such advanced knowledge. (tell him that, see what he says.)
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#11 Gareth Munden

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 05:04 AM

Hi, I'm work mostly in stills Photography here in London. I think I'm one of the only ones that still perfers film.
It's getting harder to get the stock you want at short notice even from Pro outfits ( and there are less and less of them ). Clients ask for Digi now as the think it's cheaper and they love the speed, in fack jobs get "signed" of very late now coz they can shoot Digi ( pay less, even if a H2 digi Hasselblad costs £30k which they will not pay to hire).

I think it's a leason for the furture of moving film, when the accountents take offer say good buy to film.
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#12 freddie bonfanti

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 05:21 AM

i still use slide film in still photography, call me crazy, which i usually push a couple of stops...it makes me thinking carefully about composition, exposure and various techniques and thats great cus when i get my stuff back i know it wasnt easy to achieve it. but in filmaking i go for hd with mini 35, just because film wont give me a chance to shoot as much as i want, because of the costs...and because of the look, which to me is great

Edited by freddie bonfanti, 12 September 2006 - 05:22 AM.

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#13 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 07:52 PM

The professional photographer who shot my daughter's wedding last November INSISTED on using 120-format FILM. Nothing like film to hold highlight detail in white lace and flowers, and have great flesh tones.
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#14 David Leugers

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 11:58 PM

120 format film has a real soft spot in my heart for taking still pictures. I have a relatively inexpensive Yashicamat24 that I will not part with. Pictures taken 15-20 years ago of my kids are some of the best
images I have ever taken. My wife who shoots only digital pictures now, looked through the 120 photo
album last week and couldn't believe how good they looked. Got me to get the old 120 out and to buy
some film for it. Looking forward to the fall and enjoying the art of photography rather than the "point and
shoot" of digital photography... I enjoy the craft of film and the results are definitely worth the effort to me.
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#15 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 01:38 AM

It's funny that shooting film for stills is cheaper than digital now. A friend of mine just told me about a Mamiya medium format setup that he bought for $590, including a lens! At that price you will have to shoot a lot of film before you even come close to the price of a medium format digital back, and the results will be (in my opinion) better. I may just pick up a medium format camera after hearing about the deal my friend got.
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#16 Gareth Munden

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 03:09 AM

My Mamiya RZ, which shoots 120 roll film at 6x7cms knocks the socks off most 20-30k Digi backs ( that is UK Pounds not USD ). BUT most UK photographers are using Digi. Why ?. Maybe coz they love the toys or because of the "in house" work flow i.e. Shot-Retouch-Print from your own Mac. For me this is not so much a problem coz I print my own RA4 colour prints in my own Darkroom ( but it's getting very hard to get small amounts of RA4 Chemistry now).
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#17 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 03:43 AM

My Mamiya RZ, which shoots 120 roll film at 6x7cms knocks the socks off most 20-30k Digi backs ( that is UK Pounds not USD ). BUT most UK photographers are using Digi. Why ?. Maybe coz they love the toys or because of the "in house" work flow i.e. Shot-Retouch-Print from your own Mac. For me this is not so much a problem coz I print my own RA4 colour prints in my own Darkroom ( but it's getting very hard to get small amounts of RA4 Chemistry now).


Hats off to you, making real prints of your work.
I too am a film nut. I recently bought a Nikon F4 to upgrade my lens quality. I have recently discovered what kodak ultra color 100 can do and Im exited about photography all over again. the images are absolutely amazing. the second half of my work flow is digital though, hard to get printing supplies here. but using film to capture the original image is still my prefered way to take photos.
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#18 Will Montgomery

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 04:46 PM

I find that I like using more exotic emulsions for still photography; stocks that give you a look that digital can't.

With a digital SLR I can get great, sharp images with the depth of field I like. BUT, there's something about certain B&W stocks and Kodachrome that give a look you just don't get with digital. Its almost the inaccuracies and imperfections that I love the most... grain? BRING IT ON!

Anyone use run across some stocks that give a different "look?"

Just bought a Holga 120 camera for $20 too. Having fun with it.
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#19 K Borowski

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 05:27 PM

Tell your professor that Kodak has just upgraded its film products. They're incorporating Vision-2 Advancements into the Portra line. Unfortunately, Portra 100T has been discontinued, making the 160 the slowest stills format available anymore.

6x7 cm is amazing. I don't think I'll shoot anything smaller than 6x4.5 cm (in stills ;-) ) ever again.

Regards,

~Karl
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#20 Matthew Buick

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 04:15 AM

That Professor. <_<
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