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#1 G McMahon

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 11:42 AM

I borrowed a Sony PD 150 off a friend to digitize some footage.

My computer never seemed to sense the camera there, so I could not use it to digitize. I returned the camera to the person (good friend of a good friend). Now he cannot read the camera from his computer.

He took it in for repair, and was told a power spike fried the particular part of the camera.
Could it have been me, am I liable since I was never able to see the camera on my computer or could my PC have fried the camera circuit?

History; I have never previously and since that date had problems with other cameras (only last week I used a Panasonic to digitize), nor have I had problems with my USB stick. Against me, I do not have a surge protection board on my computer. Another friend of mine had problems with his portable hard drive.

I am inept with computer technology, being involved on an internet forum is novel to me. What would people suggest is the appropriate or just course of action?
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#2 dr_gonzo

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 11:53 AM

I borrowed a Sony PD 150 off a friend to digitize some footage.

My computer never seemed to sense the camera there, so I could not use it to digitize. I returned the camera to the person (good friend of a good friend). Now he cannot read the camera from his computer.

He took it in for repair, and was told a power spike fried the particular part of the camera.
Could it have been me, am I liable since I was never able to see the camera on my computer or could my PC have fried the camera circuit?

History; I have never previously and since that date had problems with other cameras (only last week I used a Panasonic to digitize), nor have I had problems with my USB stick. Against me, I do not have a surge protection board on my computer. Another friend of mine had problems with his portable hard drive.

I am inept with computer technology, being involved on an internet forum is novel to me. What would people suggest is the appropriate or just course of action?



Firewire's get fried all the time it seems....it likely could have been your computer, but it just as easily could have been his. I'dmaybe pay half for the repairs....it cant cost that much anyway I would think.
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#3 Bob Hayes

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 11:56 AM

Throughout your career there will be times when things don?t work out. Damaged gear, dissatisfaction with results. S**T HAPPENS. Relationships are more important then money or equipment. My recommendation would be to find out the cost of the repair which might be in the $500 range and split it with your Buddy. That way neither of you has to take the financial hit alone.
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#4 G McMahon

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 12:05 PM

Thanks all so far.
I forgot to add, look at my goddamn reel attached in the other forum (this means you too Mr. Hayes).
thanks,
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 12:17 PM

I borrowed a Sony PD 150 off a friend to digitize some footage.

He took it in for repair, and was told a power spike fried the particular part of the camera.

Could it have been me, am I liable since I was never able to see the camera on my computer or could my PC have fried the camera circuit?

There's a chance that what happened was that there was a static electric charge on either you, the camera, or your computer when you plugged the firewire cable in. A very good practice when plugging up electronic gear is to discharge yourself first to a grounded metal surface on one piece of equipment by touching it with your finger, then touch the second piece of equipment (for instance: a camera on batteries, therefore no ground). And then plug the cable into the first piece of gear, and lastly, if the connectors on the cable have a metal shell, touch a metal surface on the equipment you're plugging into with the connector's metal shell.

That procedure is admittedly a bit fussy but it guarantees that everything is at ground potential as you're plugging up the gear. An absolutely anal compulsive approach would to use a standard electronics static wrist strap on you connected to a good ground - that approach is usually only necessary when actually working on the insides of electronics equipment. But in an extremely dry climate like the Artic, portions of north America in winter, etc. it's worth considering. If it's the kind of weather that you're always getting electric shocks off door knobs, etc. it wouldn't be too crazy to use a wrist strap when plugging up high dollar, expensive to repair equipment.
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#6 G McMahon

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:23 PM

[quote name='Hal Smith' date='Sep 12 2006, 09:17 AM' post='126908']
There's a chance that what happened was that there was a static electric charge on either you, the camera, or your computer when you plugged the firewire cable in. A very good practice when plugging up electronic gear is to discharge yourself first to a grounded metal surface on one piece of equipment by touching it with your finger, then touch the second piece of equipment (for instance: a camera on batteries, therefore no ground). And then plug the cable into the first piece of gear, and lastly, if the connectors on the cable have a metal shell, touch a metal surface on the equipment you're plugging into with the connector's metal shell.

How would you, or how do you get to know this stuff? I am learning that the DP is supposed to be the most omniscient on set, the problem with knowledge is that behind one door of knowledge is just more doors waiting to be opened (apart from the many others you have already opened).

How to you gauge that your level of competency is at a level to charge ?x? amount of dollars, or when you cancharge at all?

By the way, look at my reel. Comments please.
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#7 Michael Collier

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:55 PM

It all depends on background. I wanted to be an Electronic Engeneer when I was 12, so I learned all those tips hal mentioned when I was little. Everything else I have learned has come from experience or data mining the internet. You find out what you need to know, clear up things that confuse you, then go on a random hunt to find the stuff you don't know and never thought to ask. Encyclopedic knowledge will follow (not to say I know everything, far from it), a good level of understanding about electronics and binary never hurt though, given the feild your in. Elctricity is finiky, even more so when its on set, so understanding basic principles about AC, ground, static discharge, etc will help (And I find it quite interesting)

You can't really guage where your at though, since as I said you get to a point where the only things you don't know, are the things you never thought to ask about. At a certain point though you find that your knowledge averts many disasters, or can make a tough situation work. Rates are usually set against your reputation. I set my standard rate, then give discounts to first time clients. It works remarkably well. I get brought into projects I may not have had a crack at previous, but a small discount and your in. Then work to blow the client away and you'll get calls back, and be able to charge the full rate.

BTW. I will look at you 'goddamn reel' and comment when you look at my reel (under critique my work section)
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#8 G McMahon

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:59 PM

BTW. I will look at you 'goddamn reel' and comment when you look at my reel (under critique my work section)


I believe I have, goddamn you! (I hope that doesn't translate as an insult overseas)
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