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#1 Matthew Buick

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 04:00 AM

Does anyone know which Filstock was used on Grease ?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 08:01 AM

Does anyone know which Filstock was used on Grease ?


It would have been the only Kodak 35mm color neg available at the time, 5247 (125 ASA / tungsten.)

Before the 1980's, it's not that hard to figure out what stock was used. See:
http://www.kodak.com...s....6.26&lc=en

See also the August 1978 issue of "American Cinematographer" for an article on "Grease".
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 11:00 AM

Cool, thanks David. :D
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#4 Matthew Buick

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 11:27 AM

Can you get this stock in Super 8 ?
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 11:58 AM

Can you get this stock in Super 8 ?


Hi,

'47 was replaced by '48 in the late 1970's. That now been discontinued.

Stephen
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 04:56 AM

Hi,

'47 was replaced by '48 in the late 1970's. That now been discontinued.

Stephen


'48 came out in 1989-1990.

'47 was discontinued by the late 1990's. "Legends of the Fall" (1994) used 5247 for its day scenes. I used '47 in 1998 for a small feature called "The Last Big Thing."
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 04:57 AM

Hi,

'47 was replaced by '48 in the late 1970's. That now been discontinued.

Stephen


'48 came out in 1989-1990.

'47 was discontinued by the late 1990's. "Legends of the Fall" (1994) used 5247 for its day scenes. I used '47 in 1998 for a small feature called "The Last Big Thing."
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#8 Stephen Williams

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 05:15 AM

'48 came out in 1989-1990.

'47 was discontinued by the late 1990's. "Legends of the Fall" (1994) used 5247 for its day scenes. I used '47 in 1998 for a small feature called "The Last Big Thing."


David,

I remember some change to Kodak stock whilst I was working for a company I left in 1982. Could that have been '91?

From Kodak's site" EASTMAN Color Negative II film, 7/5247. Tungsten, EI 100 H. Process ECN-2. Modified. Extended latitude and improved flesh tone. First introduced in 1974. EDTA bleach. Discontinued March, 1983"

You mention 125 asa, but I am sure 5247 & 5248 were both 100 asa. I remember that 7240 reversal available at that time was 125 asa.

I have a feeling that the '47 I was using in the late 70's is not quite the same as the one you used in 1998. Hopefully John J.Pytlak from Kodak can help!

Stephen
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 11:15 AM

David,

I remember some change to Kodak stock whilst I was working for a company I left in 1982. Could that have been '91?

From Kodak's site" EASTMAN Color Negative II film, 7/5247. Tungsten, EI 100 H. Process ECN-2. Modified. Extended latitude and improved flesh tone. First introduced in 1974. EDTA bleach. Discontinued March, 1983"

You mention 125 asa, but I am sure 5247 & 5248 were both 100 asa. I remember that 7240 reversal available at that time was 125 asa.

I have a feeling that the '47 I was using in the late 70's is not quite the same as the one you used in 1998. Hopefully John J.Pytlak from Kodak can help!

Stephen


http://www.kodak.com...s....26.8&lc=en

1980

* EASTMAN Color Negative II film, 7/5247 F. Ferri bleach version (SR-29).


Kodak kept modifying it over the years, the most significant was when the Series 600 version came out in 1976. In the early 1980's, Kodak re-rated it at 125 ASA instead of 100 ASA.

I heard a rumor that John Pytlak suffered a mild heart attack and is now recovering. I hope he has a speedy recovery.
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#10 Matthew Buick

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 01:21 PM

Egad, poor John, I hope he recoves soon. :(

Do you know any Pro8mm stocks that resemble the look, and grain structure of Grease ?
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#11 ryan_bennett

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 10:23 PM

Um... what's your plan for the workflow of this piece because if you're shooting negative and telecine the footage to video you can just digitally alter the image to emulate the look of the discontinued film stock. That or have a supervised transfer, sit down with a colorist so you get the look you want exactly. Second, I think you should just do tests till you get what you want, personally what I would do and what I think you should do is set and costume design with lots of pastels and other colors used in Grease. Just copy the color palette, also I would think to use osme sort of a diffusion lens to give a soft-ish look. Good luck.
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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 12:46 AM

Do you know any Pro8mm stocks that resemble the look, and grain structure of Grease ?


"Grease" was shot in 35mm anamorphic, I believe, on 100 ASA stock -- there's no way Super-8 is ever going to resemble that look, grain-wise.

The cleanest, snappiest color stock now is probably 7285 Ektachrome 100D in Super-8; otherwise, if you need the latitude and look of color neg, use a 50D or 100T Kodak stock. But you won't come close to the grain and sharpness of something shot in 35mm anamorphic.
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#13 John Holland

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 12:44 PM

David,

I remember some change to Kodak stock whilst I was working for a company I left in 1982. Could that have been '91?

From Kodak's site" EASTMAN Color Negative II film, 7/5247. Tungsten, EI 100 H. Process ECN-2. Modified. Extended latitude and improved flesh tone. First introduced in 1974. EDTA bleach. Discontinued March, 1983"

You mention 125 asa, but I am sure 5247 & 5248 were both 100 asa. I remember that 7240 reversal available at that time was 125 asa.

I have a feeling that the '47 I was using in the late 70's is not quite the same as the one you used in 1998. Hopefully John J.Pytlak from Kodak can help!

Stephen

Stephen , just been through Kodaks list of wonders [sic] 91 did replace 47 in 1982/3 seems only in 16 mm . no mention when they dumped it in 35 mm . john Holland .
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#14 Stephen Williams

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 12:53 PM

Stephen , just been through Kodaks list of wonders [sic] 91 did replace 47 in 1982/3 seems only in 16 mm . no mention when they dumped it in 35 mm . john Holland .


John,

By 1982/83 I was shooting mostly 16mm for TV, I remember that the 16mm stock did change first. Agfa also released some new stocks about that time too.

Stephen
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#15 John Holland

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:03 PM

Stephen , you are correct about the Agfa/ Gaevert stock , it was a great stock 100asa , i was involved with a stop motion kids tv show then , did loads of tests with that . Think at that time i was the only person using it , beacause they stop making it . Didnt come back to motion picture stock till the mid 80s . After Kodaks complete cock up with 47 . John Holland
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#16 Stephen Williams

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:35 PM

Stephen , you are correct about the Agfa/ Gaevert stock , it was a great stock 100asa , i was involved with a stop motion kids tv show then , did loads of tests with that . Think at that time i was the only person using it , beacause they stop making it . Didnt come back to motion picture stock till the mid 80s . After Kodaks complete cock up with 47 . John Holland


John,

I used the Agfa 100 asa between 1982-84 on some cartoon films, the perfs were slightly undersize leading to loads of dust in the camera!

Stephen
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#17 Matthew Buick

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 01:40 PM

Um... what's your plan for the workflow of this piece because if you're shooting negative and telecine the footage to video you can just digitally alter the image to emulate the look of the discontinued film stock. That or have a supervised transfer, sit down with a colorist so you get the look you want exactly. Second, I think you should just do tests till you get what you want, personally what I would do and what I think you should do is set and costume design with lots of pastels and other colors used in Grease. Just copy the color palette, also I would think to use osme sort of a diffusion lens to give a soft-ish look. Good luck.


I'm only 15, I can't sit down with colourist and expect to be taken seriously, plus the fact this my first serious Cinematography.

"Grease" was shot in 35mm anamorphic, I believe, on 100 ASA stock -- there's no way Super-8 is ever going to resemble that look, grain-wise.

The cleanest, snappiest color stock now is probably 7285 Ektachrome 100D in Super-8; otherwise, if you need the latitude and look of color neg, use a 50D or 100T Kodak stock. But you won't come close to the grain and sharpness of something shot in 35mm anamorphic.


I liked the colours of Grease, and the way the glare hits the waves and things, I'll be shooting near the sea, we have some cracking beaches where I live.
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#18 Matthew Buick

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Posted 20 September 2006 - 12:14 PM

Basically, I want as tight a grain structure as possible.
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#19 Matthew Buick

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Posted 20 September 2006 - 04:57 PM

"Grease" was shot in 35mm anamorphic, I believe, on 100 ASA stock -- there's no way Super-8 is ever going to resemble that look, grain-wise.

The cleanest, snappiest color stock now is probably 7285 Ektachrome 100D in Super-8; otherwise, if you need the latitude and look of color neg, use a 50D or 100T Kodak stock. But you won't come close to the grain and sharpness of something shot in 35mm anamorphic.


David, I had an idea, do you think it would be possible tho buy up some of the old 35mm Negative and have it recut into Super 8 ?
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#20 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 20 September 2006 - 05:08 PM

I just want to chime in with a bit of advice, for whatever its worth.

Matthew:

Its great that you're really investing your time into learning about the different choices of film stocks and are aware of some of the factors that apply to the overall look of the film, but remember: choice of stock will not make or break your film, and while the right stock should always be used for the right job, factors like lighting, composition, pace, production design (and don't forget acting!) will have a greater impact on your audience than your grain structure.

It's easy to sit and sweat over the one "macguffin" that will make or break your film, the real challenge is working around your limitations (budget, time, skill level) and making a great (or even watchable) film.

Regardless, good luck. You have a great resource at your fingertips, but remember to shoot something in between internet sessions.
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