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Which light meter?


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#1 Robert G Andrews

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 05:35 PM

If I have a Kinor 16, would it really matter which light meter I use. Sorry, probably a dumb question. I am on the creative side rather than the tech side. **LondonFilmMan**
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#2 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 06:05 PM

If I have a Kinor 16, would it really matter which light meter I use. Sorry, probably a dumb question. I am on the creative side rather than the tech side. **LondonFilmMan**


I would recommend getting an incident meter and taking an average reading based on a few areas on or near the subject. I do this and it always worked well for me. Many people will tell you you need an expensive digital meter for "utmost accuracy" but I use an analog meter and it is still close enough. I dont think that the 1 micrometer you might be off will affect your exposure noticeably.
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#3 Robert G Andrews

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 02:22 AM

many thanks
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#4 Dino Giammattei

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 05:33 AM

In my very humble opinion, I would suggest that most any decent incident meter would be the first thing to own. If you want to add something like a spot meter later, it may fit the way you work. This old junk yard dog wouldn't know how to light without a disk and globe to do ratios. Seems to me that esoteric meters are more for final exposure calculations, and the trusty incident meter is what you use to paint your lighting.

Edited by Dino Giammattei, 16 September 2006 - 05:35 AM.

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#5 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 02:32 PM

You need a well calibrated digital incident meter. One that has settings for fps is handy and most have them.
If you opt for cine versions which are more expensive then you will have variable shutter angle settings, lux and footcandle readings and other things that are handy but not neccessary as these things can be calculated in your head or the 1st AC's head. A spot meter has proven quite useful many times but is not absolutely necessary.
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#6 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 03:32 PM

You need a well calibrated digital incident meter. One that has settings for fps is handy and most have them.
If you opt for cine versions which are more expensive then you will have variable shutter angle settings, lux and footcandle readings and other things that are handy but not neccessary as these things can be calculated in your head or the 1st AC's head. A spot meter has proven quite useful many times but is not absolutely necessary.


A digital incident meter isnt even necessary, i have an analog that works fine and still has shutter fps settings. Whats more, I got it for only $70.
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