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ON LOCATION VS. STUDIO


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#1 Timothy David Orme

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 10:43 AM

So yesterday I was finishing up shooting on location on my newest short when I realized how much of a pain the project was in general because we shot the majority of it on location with no control over the environment, the sound, etc. Thank god we shot on mini-DV and weren't burning film.

On my next project, however, I won't be shooting on mini-DV, I'll be shooting on 16mm with sync sound and we won't have a budget that will allow for too many takes (or so I'm imagining at this point). Anyways, this makes me wonder how most people deal with these sound issues when they're shooting on film. Do most people just build a set (when possible), or deal with it in post? I ask mainly because I like to deal with as few 'problems' or potential problems in post as possible.

Any tips, advice, words of wisdom?
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#2 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 10:57 AM

I think you will always get a better result by doing the majority of your sound work in post -- meaning tons of ADR and foley work -- resulting in a bigger post budget than you may be planning for. Considering that the #1 detractor from most low-budget and indie films is the sound design (often an afterthought), it is well worth it to invest in good post-sound, which will definitely give your film a greater feeling of professionalism.

Remember, while the image is more important than the sound, the audio will make or break your audiences' belief in the world you're creating. Don't make your viewers struggle to understand what's going on because dialogue is muddled, etc. If you're relying on location sound and it sucks, you're going to have to spend time and money cleaning it up anyway. Why not plan this extra step from the start?
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#3 Bob Hayes

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 11:05 AM

Anyways, this makes me wonder how most people deal with these sound issues when they're shooting on film.

Any tips, advice, words of wisdom?


My solution for dealing with sound problems was to become a cameraman.
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#4 Timothy David Orme

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 11:07 AM

I don't have any qualms with planning for a little sound work in post, but I'm really not a fan of ADR. Foley I can deal with, but ADR not so much. It just never seems to me that ADR has the same depth to it and it usually ends up looking like a foreign film with the voices dubbed over. That's less believable I think.
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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 11:41 AM

When picking locations, always check for possible sound problems: Are you under a flight path? Is there building site nearby? Do the local kids ride their motor bikes up and down outside? Do the pipes rumble?

Check the acoustics of the location, is it reverberate (you want as little as possible)?

Get a good sound recordist with good kit and use a boom operator. Sound recordists want to get the highest possible percentage of good clean sync dialogue rather than having to ADR it. You can then use that material to build up your sound track.

Good planning can save a lot of problems - films are shot all the time using dialogue recorded on location.

BTW Temporary studios can have just as many sound problems as a location - rain hitting the roof can be a killer.
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Glidecam

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Rig Wheels Passport

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