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Adding voiceovers to footage shot with Krasnogorsk-3


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#1 daniel hayes

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 02:48 PM

Hey y'all; long-time lurker, first-time poster.

I recently bought, on a whim, a Krasnogorsk-3 and some rolls of reversal film and have a few questions about my options for processing/editing.

My film "education" is pretty sporadic, mostly one-day seminars and the such that I should have paid more attention in, so my apologies in advance for any risibly obvious questions or misapprehensions. I think I have a strong enough handle on the basics of 16mm filming, lighting, etc. but my knowledge of processing/editing is inchoate at best.

I did some searches on these boards and mostly discovered people talking about how difficult/impossible syncing the sound actually is. Luckily my idea is mostly voiceovers with a few lines that don't necessarily have to be synced all that professionally. Something along the lines of Chantal Akerman's "News From Home," if that helps.

In one of my classes we shot a 100' roll of 16mm film and then had it transferred to a dv-tape for editing on Final Cut Pro and then sent a list of commands back to the lab to edit it together for us. We could have added sound, but we were lazy and lacked enthusiasm. So what is the easiest way to add voiceovers/background noises? Is it more expensive to have it transferred to digital and then back to film? Also, what is the best way to record sound if it isn't going to be synced?

I'm also looking at buying a new computer and was wondering what kind of capabilities I'd need to edit such a project. Does one need the heavy-duty Mac Pro with dual monitors or would an Imac with updated RAM and maybe an external hard drive suffice?

Thanxomuch.
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#2 s. amed hussaini

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 11:28 AM

Hey y'all; long-time lurker, first-time poster.

I recently bought, on a whim, a Krasnogorsk-3 and some rolls of reversal film and have a few questions about my options for processing/editing.

My film "education" is pretty sporadic, mostly one-day seminars and the such that I should have paid more attention in, so my apologies in advance for any risibly obvious questions or misapprehensions. I think I have a strong enough handle on the basics of 16mm filming, lighting, etc. but my knowledge of processing/editing is inchoate at best.

I did some searches on these boards and mostly discovered people talking about how difficult/impossible syncing the sound actually is. Luckily my idea is mostly voiceovers with a few lines that don't necessarily have to be synced all that professionally. Something along the lines of Chantal Akerman's "News From Home," if that helps.

In one of my classes we shot a 100' roll of 16mm film and then had it transferred to a dv-tape for editing on Final Cut Pro and then sent a list of commands back to the lab to edit it together for us. We could have added sound, but we were lazy and lacked enthusiasm. So what is the easiest way to add voiceovers/background noises? Is it more expensive to have it transferred to digital and then back to film? Also, what is the best way to record sound if it isn't going to be synced?

I'm also looking at buying a new computer and was wondering what kind of capabilities I'd need to edit such a project. Does one need the heavy-duty Mac Pro with dual monitors or would an Imac with updated RAM and maybe an external hard drive suffice?

Thanxomuch.


Interesting thread. I hope someone replies.
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#3 Kevin Masuda

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 03:14 PM

Hey y'all; long-time lurker, first-time poster.

I recently bought, on a whim, a Krasnogorsk-3 and some rolls of reversal film and have a few questions about my options for processing/editing.

My film "education" is pretty sporadic, mostly one-day seminars and the such that I should have paid more attention in, so my apologies in advance for any risibly obvious questions or misapprehensions. I think I have a strong enough handle on the basics of 16mm filming, lighting, etc. but my knowledge of processing/editing is inchoate at best.

I did some searches on these boards and mostly discovered people talking about how difficult/impossible syncing the sound actually is. Luckily my idea is mostly voiceovers with a few lines that don't necessarily have to be synced all that professionally. Something along the lines of Chantal Akerman's "News From Home," if that helps.

In one of my classes we shot a 100' roll of 16mm film and then had it transferred to a dv-tape for editing on Final Cut Pro and then sent a list of commands back to the lab to edit it together for us. We could have added sound, but we were lazy and lacked enthusiasm. So what is the easiest way to add voiceovers/background noises? Is it more expensive to have it transferred to digital and then back to film? Also, what is the best way to record sound if it isn't going to be synced?

I'm also looking at buying a new computer and was wondering what kind of capabilities I'd need to edit such a project. Does one need the heavy-duty Mac Pro with dual monitors or would an Imac with updated RAM and maybe an external hard drive suffice?

Thanxomuch.


Well adding just voiceovers should be a snap in Final Cut Pro. As far as recording sound non synced, it can be done(watch El Mariachi). The way Robert Rodriguez did it in El Mariachi was he shot each scene without sound, then right after while on set he recorded the dialog. He had to sync everything by hand which took him a long time but in the end he had a decent result. There are programs out there that make this kind of job easier. Now, you asked if it's more expensive to transfer to digital then back to film. It sounds like you're talking about DI(Digital Intermediate), yes it is very expensive and depending on project it can run you anywhere from $30K to over $100K. That may not be accurate, it may be more than what I quoted.


Now, the computer question: you can get either one of those but an Imac with enough ram should be enough.

Hope that helps.

Kev
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#4 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 08:02 AM

So what is the easiest way to add voiceovers/background noises? Is it more expensive to have it transferred to digital and then back to film? Also, what is the best way to record sound if it isn't going to be synced?


At your stage its probably best to keep to finishing your work on tape, i.e. shoot on film, telecine to a digital format (miniDV say), edit digitally and then show/distribute on a digital format.

Finishing on film probably had great eductational benefits in that class, but it has little practical use unless you about to start shooting films for theatrical presentation. Plus 16mm as a release format is pretty dead, festivals will only really accept 35mm prints or digital tapes or disks.

You could consider having your work blown-up to 35mm but perhaps not for now.

Here's a short I did a while back on 16mm with a K3, the telecine was dirt cheap and explains the terrible quality. It was edited on Final Cut Express on an eMac, finishing on miniDV and DVD.

http://www.jumpcut.c...4BB1E5938C41118
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#5 Jiekai Liao

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 04:48 PM

I once made a short on 16mm b/w, shot on an arri S without sound recording. There is only one line of dialogue. Everything is shot on one location in the streets. I tried going back the same location, have some friends re-enact the situation and record the action sounds, but it snowed badly that day and there is no way I can get any usable audio. In the end, I have my friends re-enact the scene in my apartment, I recorded the sounds and surprisingly manage to sync it all up in Pro-tools, a little manipulation is necessary, but after overlaying a noisy street ambience, all the imperfections are covered. My one line of dialogue is being dubbed in a studio and synced up in pro tools too. I used a TASCAM dat recorder to record the sounds. That is my experience, if it is helpful to you.

jiekai liao
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