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DV to analog converter


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#1 The Kyle

The Kyle
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Posted 20 September 2006 - 04:06 PM

Two Questions:

I'd like to buy some sort of external DV to analog converter so that I could send the video signal in my NLE out to an interlaced monitor. This function is usually accomplished by a deck... but I don't have enough money to buy a deck (in fact, for now, I'll be sending the signal out to my TV - I don't even have enough money to afford a professional, calibrate-able DV monitor). This kind doohickey is surprizingly difficult to track down. So far, I've found two devices that should work for this sort of thing: the DataVideo DAC-200 and the Canopus ADVC110. Does anyone know of another brand/product that would accomplish the same task (if there's something cheaper out there, I'd like to know about it--though I understand I'm probably not going to be able to pinch many pennies if I want a decent one of these things)?

And secondly--this is related, but a slightly different question: I've got an NVidia GeForce 7800 (not exactly an editor's graphics card, I know) with Video In Video Out, but I can't figure out how I'm supposed to use the thing to capture footage from an analog source. As far as I can tell, I've installed the drivers... but there just isn't anything on the computer that recognizes the existence of the VIVO port. Could someone who has one of these
types of cards explain to me what exactly is involved if I want to: A). Shoot out a signal from my computer that can be displayed on my TV, and B). Do the opposite - capture footage from an analog source. If I could figure this thing out, it might function as a temporary fix for my above problem - though I understand that if I pursue this option, the signal from the computer won't be correctly fielded/won't look right. Nevertheless, I'd like to figure it out all the same. It might work if I needed to have a larger monitor for actors to look at when I'm doing ADR... Anyway, I'm sure if I understood the damn thing, I could find some good use for it.

Thanks for any help or advice you might have to offer,

- Kyle
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#2 Bryan Darling

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Posted 20 September 2006 - 04:54 PM

To start with, the A-to-D converter. I recommend the Canopus ADVC-110. I've been using this for sometime to capture analog footage. The nice thing about Canopus is it's DV codec. It is one of the top, if not the top, codecs for DV. It's definitely worth the money.

As for your video card question, this is somewhat complex, but the simple answer is:
-The video out would actually just send out your computer desktop to a T.V. monitor. It would either mirror what you see on your computer monitor, or act as a second monitor splitting your desktop into two. One half would display on your computer monitor, the other on your T.V. monitor.

-The video in is a more complicated explanation in regards to editing and such. Essentially these devices are for home users to capture low-quality video into an easy to view format. You would not get a DV file out of it. More so a MPEG file, not the best for editing. I would suspect you'd need to use a capture program that NVidia supplied with it's CD.

So my recommendation is to invest in the Canopus converter. You'll get a lot of use out it as it's very versatile. Hope that helps.
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