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ACL2 Question


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#1 Scott Bullock

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Posted 20 September 2006 - 09:00 PM

I looked in the forums for an answer to this question but didn't locate anything. I apologize for the redundancy if it's been posted here somewhere and I simply didn't find it.

Anyway, suddenly my ACL2 decided that it doesn't want to stop in the viewing position anymore. The camera is running at proper speed so I don't think it's a battery issue, but the mirror simply isn't stopping in the viewing position as it always has in the past.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.
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#2 David Sweetman

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Posted 20 September 2006 - 09:21 PM

Are you sure it's supposed to? The shutter on my 16bl never stops in the right place either, I have to turn the inching nob until the mirror comes around. Can you still turn the inching nob and set it right?
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#3 Scott Bullock

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Posted 20 September 2006 - 10:46 PM

Hi David --

Yes, the ACL 2 is definitely supposed to stop in the viewing position. I've never had a problem with it in the past. I consulted the instruction manual and it confirms that it is supposed to stop that way. Yes, I can turn the inching knob and get it set correctly again.

This really has me bummed . . . :(
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#4 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 12:57 AM

I looked in the forums for an answer to this question but didn't locate anything. I apologize for the redundancy if it's been posted here somewhere and I simply didn't find it.

Anyway, suddenly my ACL2 decided that it doesn't want to stop in the viewing position anymore. The camera is running at proper speed so I don't think it's a battery issue, but the mirror simply isn't stopping in the viewing position as it always has in the past.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.



What version of motor you have ?
Can be a few problem.
1. If you take away electrical motor and set with reversal position of base axis, the axis can stop at 180 " position.
You need take away motor again and to turn the corner of 180 degree.

2. The problem with sensor of stopping position or electronics.
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#5 Scott Bullock

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 09:41 AM

Hi Olex --

It's the Eclair "heavy duty" motor that I believe is called the MIVAR. It's the motor designed to drive the 400' magazines.

The mirror isn't stopping in a consistant position. In other words, it might stop in the viewing position, it might be out of the viewing position entirely, or it might stop in a partial viewing position.

Could it be a result of a battery losing voltage? Like I said above, the camera is coming up to speed, but perhaps the battery is set to die and it's messing with the shutter before it's messing with the speed of the camera.
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#6 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 11:47 AM

Never had this happen with my ACLII in the 15+ years I've had one.
If you suspect that it is because the battery is not fully charged, why not charge or swap out the battery and see if the problem persists.
If it does it should be looked at by a camera tech.
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#7 Scott Bullock

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 11:54 AM

Thanks for the advice, Dan. I've got a battery on charge as we speak, so I will check that when I get home. Man, I really hope that the motor isn't about to fry on me . . . :o
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#8 Bernie O'Doherty

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Posted 21 September 2006 - 10:02 PM

Hi, Scott,

Over the last 25-odd years, about 20% of the ACLs I've serviced have had the same issue you're having with the ACL 2 motors. The sensing unit goes kaputt. The problem is that it is difficult to find replacement parts. I have gotten close to electronic parameters with substitute sensors, but they don't integrate well with the motor electronics. In one case, the amperage draw on the substitute unit caused the motor to switch partial power from the drive to the sensor making the motor speed inconsistent. That was a scary one.

Unlike non-Eclair crystal motors, which use separate crystals for different speeds, the ACL 2 motor subdivides signals in order to come to the various speeds. Even within the ACL 2 motors, different chips are used for those subdivisions, so there is no standardization.

Have a tech take the motor apart and check out the sensor and see if a substitute sensor can be found that has close to the same electronic parameters as the original. Bottom line is that it's not an easy problem to solve, and most of my customers end up inching the motor into position rather than pay a lot to have the motor repaired or replaced entirely.

Cheers,
Bernie
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#9 Scott Bullock

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 12:45 AM

Hi Bernie --

Thanks for the response, but can you please clarify a few points for me?

First of all, you believe that the problem most likely resides in the motor itself and not the camera's electronic base, right? And secondly, short of replacing and or attempting to repair the motor, I can operate the camera properly by simply inching the shutter into the viewing position before resuming filming, correct? In other words, if I'm willing to sacrifice the motor's ability to stop with the shutter in the viewing position, the camera should otherwise operate normally, right?

Finally, if I were to send you the camera for inspection/service, would I need to send anything besides the motor, or should I send the camera body, electronic base, viewfinder, etc.?

Honestly, so long as the camera is otherwise operating correctly, I don't think it'd bother me all that much to inch the shutter into place, at least until some point when I can come across another motor (assuming it's the motor and not the electronic base, which is what you seem to be telling me.)

Thanks again,

Scott
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#10 Scott Bullock

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 12:56 AM

One more thought (sorry . . . :( ):

Will any of this affect the motor's ability to properly drive a 400' magazine?
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#11 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 01:20 AM

One more thought (sorry . . . :( ):

Will any of this affect the motor's ability to properly drive a 400' magazine?


It's really not a big deal. My ACL works great and the shutter never stops in the
correct position. You get used to it after awhile. :rolleyes: :unsure:
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#12 Bernie O'Doherty

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 09:23 AM

First of all, you believe that the problem most likely resides in the motor itself and not the camera's electronic base, right?


Most times the problems is in the motor, but it could also be in the feedback signal to the chip from the base electonics.

And secondly, short of replacing and or attempting to repair the motor, I can operate the camera properly by simply inching the shutter into the viewing position before resuming filming, correct? In other words, if I'm willing to sacrifice the motor's ability to stop with the shutter in the viewing position, the camera should otherwise operate normally, right?


Right on both of those!

Finally, if I were to send you the camera for inspection/service, would I need to send anything besides the motor, or should I send the camera body, electronic base, viewfinder, etc.?


I always prefer to have the complete rig (in this case, motor, camera body, and electronic base at a minimum)--this way I can feel certain that everything's working properly as a unit.

Honestly, so long as the camera is otherwise operating correctly, I don't think it'd bother me all that much to inch the shutter into place, at least until some point when I can come across another motor (assuming it's the motor and not the electronic base, which is what you seem to be telling me.)


This is what I would recommend. Also, the motor should have no problem pulling a 400' load. The thing that generally prevents the motor from pulling a 400' load is that the camera mechanism is too tight or the mags need servicing. Eclair installed "self-lubricating" bearings in all of their cameras, which theoretically should never need to be lubed, but that just ain't so. They dry out rather quickly and do require attention at least once every two or three years.

Cheers,
Bernie
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#13 Scott Bullock

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 08:05 PM

John, thanks for the encouraging response. I suppose you are right, it's really not a big deal as long as it's not a sign of a more significant problem.

Bernie, thanks for all of the information. At some point I definitely need to send you my ACL for servicing. At the moment, however, I have a new baby, my first, that is now taking priority over my cameras. But I'm slowly setting some money aside so that I can get it serviced in the near future.

By the way, in your experience, how reliable is the sych light on the ACL 2 motor?

Message to all: I'm seriously considering selling my AZ Spectrum video assist unit. It's color and in excellent condition, I just don't find myself using it all that often. Anyone who might be interested in it should contact me. I just thought I'd put that out there because I'm about 90% positive that it's going to happen. I also have a 16:9 LCD monitor that's part of the package. The unit is specifically designed for the ACL.
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