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#1 Chris Fernando

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 12:34 AM

Getting ready to shoot a no-budget feature (i.e. no calibrated field monitor for exposure) and I'm wondering what the best way to judge exposure is. I've heard you can dial a 320 into your meter and this is supposed to work. How safe is this? I'm used to judging zebras set at 80 on my DVX, but that's just because it's my DVX. Any suggestions? Thanks, as always, folks.
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#2 Jonathan Benny

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 01:06 AM

(i.e. no calibrated field monitor for exposure) and I'm wondering what the best way to judge exposure is. I've heard you can dial a 320 into your meter and this is supposed to work.


I would do some tests and become familiar with how the image (on the particular camera you'll be using) responds to various exposures vs zebra indications and start from there. Everyone has a different way of using zebras (if at all). I wouldn't just decide to dial 320 into a meter - you need to know what you're doing/getting out there so that you can deliver quality results. Take some time to do tests and see what happens with the zebra settings/readings vs exposure/resulting image etc.

Take the camera out for a day, roll some tests, take notes based on different settings, watch the tape on a good crt monitor at home or in the office and refer to your notes. I think you'll find that the zebra indicator is simply a starting point from which you then make judgements by eye.

AJB
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#3 Seth Melnick

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 10:50 AM

Do not use a light meter with a digital camera - it is not the right tool. The camera does not respond linearly to light - it can be less sensitive at lower light levels.

The true correct tool is a wavefrom monitor to show you exactly what the camera is seeing - besides that, get a good production monitor and make sure the image looks like you want it to.

If you really like using a light meter - use it to get in the neighborhood but then put it down and reference your monitor (do not use the on camera lcd)
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#4 Chris Fernando

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 05:04 PM

Thanks for the input. Yeah testing and a monitor would be ideal, but this isn't the ideal situation. Pretty much confined to judging off the LCD monitor and using the zebras and the first days stuff didn't look bad exposure-wise. The thing to remember when using the zebras is they are only telling you what is over, not what's under.

I have to say; I'm a bit surprised at the dynamic range of the CCD's on this thing. We had one shot with a subject sitting in front of a window with venitian blinds, and although the blinds were closed there was still quite a bit of light leaking through. I tried to balance out the lighting indoors with what was coming through the window as best I could and it held up pretty well. I'll try and post some screen grabs (some day), pending approval.

As an aside to all the monitor advice, I was wandering if there is a relatively cheap on-board monitor that can pull double duty as a monitor to judge exposure and color (as well as a sort of low-budget director's monitor) on something like the HVX and also be used as an on-board on more conventional 16/35/HD AC/Focus Pulling gigs. Any recommendations?
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#5 Gunleik Groven

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 08:06 AM

As an aside to all the monitor advice, I was wandering if there is a relatively cheap on-board monitor that can pull double duty as a monitor to judge exposure and color (as well as a sort of low-budget director's monitor) on something like the HVX and also be used as an on-board on more conventional 16/35/HD AC/Focus Pulling gigs. Any recommendations?


I love the Panny 17" (Panasonic BT-LH1700W)

It also has a waveform monitor, but you can't really tape it to the camera...

Gunleik
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#6 Matt Irwin

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 12:39 PM

As an aside to all the monitor advice, I was wandering if there is a relatively cheap on-board monitor that can pull double duty as a monitor to judge exposure and color (as well as a sort of low-budget director's monitor) on something like the HVX and also be used as an on-board on more conventional 16/35/HD AC/Focus Pulling gigs. Any recommendations?

The 7" Marshall R70P-HDA is a common choice. Not an HD screen, but takes an HD analog signal and is fully calibratable. I've used it before, and it works well for exposure/color and focus. No waveform though. There's definitely much better out there, but hey--- $1300....
(BTW, a normal 7" hoodman won't fit- they make one specifically for this monitor)
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#7 Matt Workman

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 11:03 PM

Pansonic makes an HD onboard monitor, for the Varicam. But I'm sure it would work with the HVX with the right cables. It has a waveform also. Its around $5k.

Matt
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#8 Barbu balasoiu

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 07:19 AM

Pansonic makes an HD onboard monitor, for the Varicam. But I'm sure it would work with the HVX with the right cables. It has a waveform also. Its around $5k.

Matt


Sorry to ask the same question again but I didn t realy found out what the real ISO rating was for the HVX200 is.......
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#9 Ian Dudley

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 06:46 PM

Sorry to ask the same question again but I didn t realy found out what the real ISO rating was for the HVX200 is.......


Hi,

The consensus seems to be around 320 asa, but as noted elsewhere the HVX does not respond linearly to light. In very low light settings it's closer to 200 asa.

cheers,

Ian Dudley
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#10 Stefan Dux

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 07:09 PM

hi

we tried to test it once, and we didn't get much more than about 100 ASA with the particular camera we had. but it also reacted differently in different light situations.

cheers,

stefan
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#11 Rodrigo Llano

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Posted 15 January 2007 - 12:51 PM

I'd test it last week, and i was surprised with the low sensivity of hvx 200, around 160 ISO. A huge difference if Panasonic try to sell this camera as a second camera for Varicam shots.

Respectfully

Rodrigo

BTW..

Depend of the mode the HVX 200 have big ligth response differences. IS NOT the same exposure for 720 60p or 720 24np ..

Obviously some settings make some differences..

rodrigo
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#12 andres victorero

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 01:46 PM

I just worked with this cam this weekend (DP of a short film) i shot mostly interiors with tunsgsten lights. iris was around 2 - 2.8 and i made some test and the ISO rating was 250 ISO, but this is only for orientation, if you want to find the correct exposure check a Waveform monitor or DV Rack software.

Good luck
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