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ORWO NP55


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#1 andres victorero

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 11:22 AM

Hi i just get some carts of ORWO NP55. I don´t know nothing about this stock, only it´s a 80ASA.

I plan to develop the stock in home in lomo tank.
I´m not sure about if can be developed like a resevrsal B/W stock, someone knows something abot this?

thanks
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#2 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 12:46 PM

Hi i just get some carts of ORWO NP55. I don´t know nothing about this stock, only it´s a 80ASA.

I plan to develop the stock in home in lomo tank.
I´m not sure about if can be developed like a resevrsal B/W stock, someone knows something abot this?

thanks


You can check
http://www.filmotec....s/products.html

I not see NP55 film on list of ORWO films, they show B&W negative films UN-54, N-74.
The peoples from Filmotec told me about processing of B&W negative films on reversal technology.
Yes, This is possible.
I make a some test with other type of B&W negative films, any case you will need make a some test too.
I don't know structure of NP55 film, but, I know, Svema B&W negative films included antihalation layer and this is layer can spoil of reversal image on processing with optical re-exposing.
That's why, i use chemical re-exposing and re-exposing on Ultra-red lights.

I had very good result of processing B&W film on reversal processing with SVEMA MZ-3, ZT-8, Micrat-200, Micrat-300 , ORWO DP-3 films.

Edited by Olex Kalynychenko, 22 September 2006 - 12:46 PM.

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#3 andres victorero

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 11:18 AM

Thanks Olex. I made some test with bad results. I reexposing the film with light but It don´t work.
what kind of chemical can i use for chemical reexposing?
thanks

Edited by andres victorero, 27 September 2006 - 11:19 AM.

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#4 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 11:56 AM

Thanks Olex. I made some test with bad results. I reexposing the film with light but It don´t work.
what kind of chemical can i use for chemical reexposing?
thanks


If i will need make similar test, for begin , need check film like a B&W negative film, measuring real final speed of film and other.
The next test can be with B&W reversal processing.
Send me letter on olex@a-teleport.com i will send you a few formulas of chemical reexposing.
The other idea.
Kodak E-6 chemistry have solution " reversal batch process E-6 ", possile, can be good idea test this is chemistry with B&W film too.
I not make test with Kodak E-6 reversal batch.
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#5 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 03:02 PM

If i will need make similar test, for begin , need check film like a B&W negative film, measuring real final speed of film and other.
The next test can be with B&W reversal processing.
Send me letter on olex@a-teleport.com i will send you a few formulas of chemical reexposing.
The other idea.
Kodak E-6 chemistry have solution " reversal batch process E-6 ", possile, can be good idea test this is chemistry with B&W film too.
I not make test with Kodak E-6 reversal batch.


I have a copy of the NP55 datasheet. It is a panchromatic negative stock; the speed is ISO 80 and it recomends developing to an average gradient of 0.65 by developing for about 6 mins in ORWO developer 17. There is no mention of processing as a reversal but conversely it does not say it cannot be done.

I have worked in labs doing B/W Reversal processing and it is not usually a problem to reversal process a B/W neg stock. If I remember correctly you get a slight increase in speed when reversal processing a negative stock of around 1/2 a stop.

You do not mention what the problem is with the reversal exposure. It is important to give sufficient exposure for it to work correctly; you would have to give a very high exposure for there to be any problem with too much exposure.

Brian
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#6 Richardson Leao

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 07:40 PM

I dunno if it would be the same, but I developed NP7 negatives as reversal with reasonable quality. The recipe:

kodak d19 + 9g of sodium tiocyanate (optional) - in 1L.

@22-23C - 4-5 min,
bleach 5min
clearing 5min
rexposure 4min
kodak d19 (no silver solvent) - 5min
fixer
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#7 andres victorero

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 09:20 AM

Thanks to all for the replies.
I´m a absolute beginner in home processing.
the problem is that the film developed is black. I use Foma R100 chemicals, I´m not sure if the problem is the chemicals or the reexposure :rolleyes:
I´ll try again
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#8 Robert Hughes

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 10:11 AM

I don't know about the Orwo film / Foma processing connection. I have heard that Foma film in Kodak reversal processing is not reliable. Fomapan film uses a unique formulation requiring Foma chemicals, and supposedly has a silver antihalation layer on the back which must be removed (similar to old Kodak 4X reversal).
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#9 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 08:36 AM

Thanks to all for the replies.
I´m a absolute beginner in home processing.
the problem is that the film developed is black. I use Foma R100 chemicals, I´m not sure if the problem is the chemicals or the reexposure :rolleyes:
I´ll try again


If the film is black then it can either have been unexposed in the camera or the first developer has not worked. You need to look and see if you can see any edge printing saying 'Orwo' or there should be clear areas where you laced the film in the camera. if you have no edge printing then the first developer has not worked. If you do have edge printing then the film was not exposed in the camera. The film being black means that it has been correctly re-exposed and re-developed.

Brian
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#10 Clive Tobin

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 11:33 PM

Thanks Olex. I made some test with bad results. I reexposing the film with light but It don´t work.
what kind of chemical can i use for chemical reexposing?
thanks


This is all barking up the wrong tree. Re-exposure is not the problem, if this is inadequate the film will come out all clear and not all black.

Negative film generally does not process worth a darn by reversal. The thick negative emulsion develops and bleaches much slower than reversal films.

You probably need extra time in the first developer to prevent excess density in the redeveloped film.

You "MUST" inspect the film after bleaching to make sure all of the silver formed in the first developer has been bleached away. Otherwise, after redeveloping the film will be all black. This can be done in the light.

Re-exposure is not any particular problem. Redeveloper time probably must be increased.

Negative does not have a hardened thin emulsion and extra drying time will be needed.
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#11 Christian Appelt

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 09:30 AM

Please note that Orwo NP55 has been out of production for at least ten years!
The stock you have might even be as old as 15 years or more, so unless it was stored in a deep freezer, you will have to do some testing to find out whether you can get decent contrast by finding the right exposure-processing combination.

NP55 was a fine grained b&w neg stock rated at 80ASA. It gave a really nice vintage b&w look and - from my experience - could look superior to comparable Eastman b&w stock.

Happy testing! B)

Edited by Christian Appelt, 23 October 2006 - 09:30 AM.

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